Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Computer Cracks Go Game

Date:
February 14, 2005
Source:
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research
Summary:
A computer program that can solve the Go game for a 5x5 playing board. Dutch researcher Erik van der Werf achieved a world first with this program. A complete Go playing board has 19x19 rows. Van der Werf investigated new computing techniques to improve the Go programs with the ultimate aim of beating the best human players.

A computer program that can solve the Go game for a 5x5 playing board. Dutch researcher Erik van der Werf achieved a world first with this program. A complete Go playing board has 19x19 rows. Van der Werf investigated new computing techniques to improve the Go programs with the ultimate aim of beating the best human players.

Related Articles


Not only has Van der Werf solved the Go game on a playing board of 5x5 rows, but also Battle Go (a simplified version of Go) for boards of up to 6x6 rows. With their last program MAGOG, Van der Werf and his colleagues won the bronze medal at the 9x9 Go tournament, held at the ninth Computer Olympiad in Israel last summer.

<b>Technique</b>

Van der Werf's research focused on searching and learning techniques for games programs. Searching techniques are used in chess programs to think several moves ahead. This allows the tactical complications in positions to be better assessed. A search program that is efficient enough to think so far ahead that it achieves end positions can, in principle, play perfectly. The MIGOS program used to solve the Go game on a 5x5 playing board, is based on searching techniques.

However, searching techniques alone are not enough to play Go well on larger playing boards. Then the program cannot always search deep enough to achieve end positions. Therefore, Van der Werf also investigated learning techniques, which are used in games such as backgammon or other complex applications such as image recognition. The computer uses learning techniques to learn from human demonstration games which the Go program analyses. Van der Werf used learning techniques to predict strong positions, predict life and death and to estimate potential territory.

<b>Tactics</b>

Go is a board game from Eastern Asia for two players. Each tries to surround a territory with stones of their colour. A player can strike the stones of his opponent by surrounding these with his own stones. The player with the most territory wins the game. According to legend, the game was first played in 2300 BC by a Chinese emperor who wanted to teach his son tactics, strategy and concentration.

In 1997, the chess computer Deep Blue beat the world chess champion Kasparov. Yet almost eight years later, a Go program that can beat a good amateur has yet to be developed. In the mid-1980s the Taiwanese industrial mogul Mr Ing put up $1 million for the maker of the first Go program capable of beating a professional player. The prize money expired in 2000 with the death of Mr Ing, but the challenge has yet to be met.

The research was funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. "Computer Cracks Go Game." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050213135635.htm>.
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. (2005, February 14). Computer Cracks Go Game. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050213135635.htm
Netherlands Organization For Scientific Research. "Computer Cracks Go Game." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050213135635.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Real-Life Transformer Robot Walks, Then Folds Into a Car

Real-Life Transformer Robot Walks, Then Folds Into a Car

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) Brave Robotics and Asratec teamed with original Transformers toy company Tomy to create a functional 5-foot-tall humanoid robot that can march and fold itself into a 3-foot-long sports car. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft Riding High On Strong Surface, Cloud Performance

Microsoft Riding High On Strong Surface, Cloud Performance

Newsy (Oct. 24, 2014) Microsoft's Q3 earnings showed its tablets and cloud services are really hitting their stride. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Apps to Organize Your Life

The Best Apps to Organize Your Life

Buzz60 (Oct. 23, 2014) Need help organizing your bills, schedules and other things? Ko Im (@konakafe) has the best apps to help you stay on top of it all! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nike And Apple Team Up To Create Wearable ... Something

Nike And Apple Team Up To Create Wearable ... Something

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) For those looking for wearable tech that's significantly less nerdy than Google Glass, Nike CEO Mark Parker says don't worry, It's on the way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins