Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Jefferson Scientists Uncover Potential Trigger Of Diabetic Kidney Disease

Date:
February 24, 2005
Source:
Thomas Jefferson University
Summary:
Scientists at Jefferson Medical College and Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified a protein that plays a leading part in triggering kidney disease in diabetic patients, a condition known as diabetic nephropathy and the leading cause of kidney failure worldwide. The finding, which they report February 22 in the journal PLoS Medicine, could lead to the eventual development of compounds that might be used to treat diabetic kidney disease.

Scientists at Jefferson Medical College and Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified a protein that plays a leading part in triggering kidney disease in diabetic patients, a condition known as diabetic nephropathy and the leading cause of kidney failure worldwide. The finding, which they report February 22 in the journal PLoS Medicine, could lead to the eventual development of compounds that might be used to treat diabetic kidney disease.

According to study co-author Kumar Sharma, M.D., director of the Center for Diabetic Kidney Disease at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and professor of medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, more than 40 percent of patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease also have diabetic nephropathy. While diabetic nephropathy affects approximately one in three people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, how diabetes damages the kidneys is poorly understood.

Dr. Sharma, along with Erwin Bφttinger, M.D., professor of medicine and pharmacology and biological chemistry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and their co-workers looked at kidney samples from mice and people with and without diabetes and looked at the effects of high glucose on the kidney cells.

The researchers found that a protein called CD36 was present in a specific cell type called the proximal tubular epithelial cell in human diabetic kidney disease. In humans, the cells seem to be involved in a self-directed cell death or apoptosis in diabetic kidney disease.

"We think CD36 might be a switch that is turned on in the human condition, and might be one of the reasons these cells die in human disease and start a cascade of progressive kidney failure," Dr. Sharma explains. "If we can develop compounds to block CD36, it could potentially be a clinical intervention. "Our thinking is completely novel – that CD36 is a key player in causing progressive diabetic kidney disease," he says. "We think as the diabetic kidney gets damaged, more and more of these proteins and free fatty acids go through the urine and hit these tubular cells. The tubular cells, via CD36, take them up and start the apoptosis pathway and ultimately cause fibrosis and progressive kidney failure as a result. We found almost all of the apoptotic cells had CD36 in them. If we block CD36 in cell culture, these proteins and free fatty acids don't cause apoptosis."

Next, the researchers would like to develop a mouse model that overexpresses CD36. "By increasing CD36 levels, we'd like to find out if this does cause the apoptotic pathway with co-existing diabetes," Dr. Sharma says. He notes that there is some evidence showing that CD36 might be involved in vascular damage in diabetes and lead to atherosclerosis. It might play an important role not only in the kidney but in the vasculature and in the development of atherosclerosis.

Dr. Sharma currently is conducting a study to evaluate how a new medicine may reduce scar tissue in damaged kidneys. "The goal of this study – the only one of its kind in the United States – is to evaluate the extent to which a new compound, called pirfenidone, can prevent the kidney scarring that often results from diabetes," he says.

Kidney scarring results from the excessive activity of a molecule called transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). In previous studies, Dr. Sharma's research group found the TGF-beta stimulates overproduction of the scar tissue in the kidneys of diabetic patients and prevents normal kidney function. The new drug, pirfenidone, was shown to block the damaging effects of TGF-beta. "This trial will help us is to see if an antifibrotic approach will add to the armamentarium of arresting diabetic nephropathy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Thomas Jefferson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Thomas Jefferson University. "Jefferson Scientists Uncover Potential Trigger Of Diabetic Kidney Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 February 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050223164704.htm>.
Thomas Jefferson University. (2005, February 24). Jefferson Scientists Uncover Potential Trigger Of Diabetic Kidney Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050223164704.htm
Thomas Jefferson University. "Jefferson Scientists Uncover Potential Trigger Of Diabetic Kidney Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050223164704.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 23, 2014) — The WHO has warned up to 20,000 people could be infected with Ebola over the next few weeks. As Sonia Legg reports, the implications for the West African countries suffering from the disease are huge. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million Within 4 Months

Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million Within 4 Months

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) — Health officials warn that without further intervention, the number of Ebola cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone could reach 1.4 million by January. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Cases to Triple in Weeks Without Drastic Action

WHO: Ebola Cases to Triple in Weeks Without Drastic Action

AFP (Sep. 23, 2014) — The number of Ebola infections will triple to 20,000 by November, soaring by thousands every week if efforts to stop the outbreak are not stepped up radically, the WHO warned in a study on Tuesday. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
5 Ways Men Can Prevent Most Heart Attacks

5 Ways Men Can Prevent Most Heart Attacks

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) — No surprise here: A recent study says men can reduce their risk of heart attack by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, which includes daily exercise. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins