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Pushy Parents Can Be Bad For Their Children's Health

Date:
March 23, 2005
Source:
British Medical Journal
Summary:
Well intentioned, but pushy parents, intent on exercising their rights as healthcare consumers, can be bad for their children's health, suggests a small study in Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Well intentioned, but pushy parents, intent on exercising their rights as healthcare consumers, can be bad for their children's health, suggests a small study in Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Clinical researchers from the Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, analysed the health outcomes of 23 children, who had been referred between 1997 and 2001.

The children, whose average age was 14, had all been diagnosed with severe abdominal pain, with no obvious organic (physical) cause, which had greatly disrupted their lives.

They had been given the normal battery of tests for severe abdominal pain, including blood samples, ultrasound, and endoscopy, in accordance with clinical guidelines.

Fifteen of the children had already seen between two and seven consultants at the time of referral. Seven parents were subsequently unhappy with the choice of investigations and requested other procedures for which there was no accepted indication. Two families had their requests granted through referral elsewhere.

Twelve families made a formal complaint to the hospital or their MP about some aspect of care.

Despite the fact that psychological factors are known to have a role in this condition, only 13 families accepted referral to psychological services. In 12, a significant degree of family conflict/dysfunction and a lack of insight into the consequences of parental behaviour on illness pattern were evident.

Eleven of these children improved after psychological support and resumed normal activities within a year.

Ten families refused psychological help, and only three of these children eventually improved. In each of these three cases, the families had eventually realised the impact of psychological factors.

The authors suggest that their findings illustrate the dangers of 'healthcare consumerism' in families who lack insight into the derivation of their children's symptoms.

"Robust systems are needed to protect the child and perhaps his/her physician from the effects of 'healthcare consumerism,'" they say.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

British Medical Journal. "Pushy Parents Can Be Bad For Their Children's Health." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050323001242.htm>.
British Medical Journal. (2005, March 23). Pushy Parents Can Be Bad For Their Children's Health. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050323001242.htm
British Medical Journal. "Pushy Parents Can Be Bad For Their Children's Health." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050323001242.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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