Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Research Urgently Needed To Treat Blood Clots In Children

Date:
April 16, 2005
Source:
University Of Alberta
Summary:
Potentially deadly blood clots are being missed in children, and more research and awareness is needed in the medical community, according to a researcher from the University of Alberta.

A review of treatments for pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) in children, conducted by the University of Alberta, the Edmonton Stollery Children's Hospital and The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, revealed an acute need for more research into diagnosing the condition, whose symptoms can be misleading.

Review of data on 405 children who died in specialized pediatric hospitals in Canada between 1991-97 revealed that three per cent of the deaths were attributable to blood clots. "The condition does kill and it can also cause long-term cardiac problems or respiratory problems," Dr. Massicotte said.

The review results appear in the March, 2005 issue of Pediatric Radiology.

The condition, which exists in children ranging from premature infants to the late teens, is often not discovered until the autopsy stage. PTE most frequently exists in children who suffer from underlying conditions such as heart disease or cancer. Blood clots can be brought on by several risk factors and causes including burns, heart disease, dehydration, obesity, renal disease, shock and surgery.

One of the highest risk factors for blood clots in children is a central venous line, a large catheter inserted into the body to administer medication or nutrients. The line can damage vessel walls. But at the same time, the line is needed to help care for children suffering illness or trauma, and that makes recognizing the symptoms of PTE all the more vital, Dr. Massicotte said.

While the causes of blood clots in 30 to 40 per cent of adults have unknown origins, to their surprise, the researchers discovered in the review that only four per cent of the clots in children presented without any risk factors, Dr. Massicotte noted.

"The other 96 per cent had at least two or more known risk factors. The expert care centres (pediatric hospitals) know that children develop blood clots, but there are a lot of other health professionals who still don't recognize the signs and symptoms."

Further research is needed, exploring such options as smaller catheters for pediatric patients, as well as clinical trials in using blood-thinners as preventive therapy. Currently, thinners are used only after a child develops clots.

Traditionally, researching more invasive treatment options for children has been regarded with reluctance, Dr. Massicotte said. "Because babies and children are so cute and innocent, we are reluctant to do studies, but we are not benefiting them at all by doing that."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Alberta. "Research Urgently Needed To Treat Blood Clots In Children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050415204825.htm>.
University Of Alberta. (2005, April 16). Research Urgently Needed To Treat Blood Clots In Children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050415204825.htm
University Of Alberta. "Research Urgently Needed To Treat Blood Clots In Children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050415204825.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Apple has delayed the launch of the HealthKit app platform, citing a bug. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Food Makers Surpass Calorie-Cutting Pledge

U.S. Food Makers Surpass Calorie-Cutting Pledge

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Sixteen large food and beverage companies in the United States that committed to cut calories in their products far surpassed their target. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Haitians receive the second dose of the vaccine against cholera as part of the UN's vaccination campaign. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins