Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Portable Radiation Detectors Generally Meet Standards

Date:
April 27, 2005
Source:
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Summary:
Portable radiation detectors generally perform well enough to meet new consensus standards but provide inaccurate readings for certain types of radiation, according to recent tests by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

NIST researcher Leticia Pibida uses a hand-held radiation detection device to check the cargo of truck trailer.
Credit: Image Robert Rathe / Courtesy of NIST

Portable radiation detectors generally perform well enough to meet new consensus standards but provide inaccurate readings for certain types of radiation, according to recent tests by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

The results, reported in the May issue of the journal Health Physics,* are based on NIST tests of 31 commercial detectors, including hand-held survey meters; electronic personal alarming detectors (similar to pagers); and radionuclide identifiers (specialized devices that can identify specific radioactive materials). A number of federal, state and local agencies are using such instruments as part of homeland security-related efforts to detect and identify radioactive materials.


Researchers compared the devices' exposure rate readings to NIST measurements for different energy and intensity levels produced by NIST's calibrated gamma ray and X-ray beam lines. The responses of the majority of the detectors agreed with NIST-measured values, within acceptable uncertainties, for tests with gamma rays. This performance meets requirements established by new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards, adopted by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2004. However, there was a large discrepancy between most detectors' readings and the NIST values for the lowest-energy X-rays. For instance, readings by 14 detectors were roughly 40 to 100 percent below the NIST value. The deviations were much larger than those stated in manufacturers' specifications.

The tests are intended to help first responders and government agencies make better use of existing equipment and acquire the right equipment for emergency response, and to encourage manufacturers to better design and characterize their instruments. The tests were performed as part of the NIST program to support the development of the new ANSI standards (see www.nist.gov/public_affairs/factsheet/radiation_detector_standards.htm)
as well as to support the NIST Office of Law Enforcement Standards and DHS in testing detectors for their use by first responders.

*L. Pibida, R. Minniti, M. O'Brien, and M. Unterweger. Test of Radiation Detectors used in Homeland Security Applications. Health Physics. May. Vol. 88, Number 5. Posted online April 13, 2005.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute of Standards and Technology. "Portable Radiation Detectors Generally Meet Standards." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050421210615.htm>.
National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2005, April 27). Portable Radiation Detectors Generally Meet Standards. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050421210615.htm
National Institute of Standards and Technology. "Portable Radiation Detectors Generally Meet Standards." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050421210615.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) If you've ever watched "Back to the Future Part II" and wanted to get your hands on a hoverboard, well, you might soon be in luck. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) Researchers in South Korea are developing a robotic pilot that could potentially replace humans in the cockpit. Unlike drones and autopilot programs which are configured for specific aircraft, the robots' humanoid design will allow it to fly any type of plane with no additional sensors. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) British scientists have developed a prototype graphene paint that can make coatings which are resistant to liquids, gases, and chemicals. The team says the paint could have a variety of uses, from stopping ships rusting to keeping food fresher for longer. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins