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Type 2 Diabetes May Begin With Grandma's Diet

Date:
May 12, 2005
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
An innovative study published online in The Journal of Physiology in Press provides the first evidence that the insulin resistance typical of type 2 diabetes can be "programmed" across two generations by poor nutrition during a grandmother's pregnancy and lactation.

An innovative study published online in The Journal of Physiology in Press provides the first evidence that the insulin resistance typical of type 2 diabetes can be "programmed" across two generations by poor nutrition during a grandmother's pregnancy and lactation.

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The study, from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and the Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition in Mexico City, showed that grandsons and granddaughters of female rats fed an inadequate diet during pregnancy and/or lactation were more likely to become obese and insulin resistant than grandchildren of females fed an adequate diet.

The research dramatically extends previous findings that poor maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation predisposes the first generation of offspring to diabetes. The study is the first to show that the adverse effects can be passed to adult grandchildren across two generations.

Peter W. Nathanielsz, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director of the new Center for Pregnancy and Newborn Research at the Health Science Center, explains: "These new findings stretch the unwanted consequences of poor nutrition across generations. It offers us important clues about the origins of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Knowledge of the origins of type 2 diabetes has the potential to improve the health of millions as well as deliver very significant economic savings.

"The granddaughters were more affected when their maternal grandmothers were undernourished during pregnancy. The grandsons, however, were more affected when their maternal grandmothers were undernourished during lactation. Thus, there are gender differences in the effects on the grandchildren, according to the time of exposure to a poor diet during their grandmothers' own development."

Other researchers who have explored the issue have not tried to tease out the effects of poor nutrition in pregnancy in distinction to lactation.

Dr. Nathanielsz said the finding is important because it re-emphasizes the need to provide better maternal care and advice to women about good nutrition both during pregnancy and lactation.

Dr. Nathanielsz, who joined the Health Science Center in 2004 from New York University Medical School, is the author of several books, including "Life in the Womb: the Origin of Health and Disease" (Promethean Press, 1999) and "The Prenatal Prescription" (HarperCollins Publishers, 2001). He is a widely quoted authority on fetal and early development.

He said the finding that the diets of grandmothers can affect the health of grandchildren is "the confluence of nature and nurture -- it's one of the hottest health care stories there is."



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Type 2 Diabetes May Begin With Grandma's Diet." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 May 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050512110847.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2005, May 12). Type 2 Diabetes May Begin With Grandma's Diet. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050512110847.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Type 2 Diabetes May Begin With Grandma's Diet." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050512110847.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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