Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adsorbent Materials For The Storage Of Hydrogen

Date:
June 28, 2005
Source:
Elhuyar Fundazioa
Summary:
A research team from the Public University of Navarra has started a study of the design and development of absorbent materials that enable the storage of hydrogen.

A research team from the Public University of Navarra has started a study of the design and development of absorbent materials that enable the storage of hydrogen, a clean fuel that can be used as an alternative to those derived from fossil fuels, such as petrol and diesel. The storage of this element is, in fact, a key process in the change over from internal combustion engines – contaminating and not very efficient, to cars with hydrogen fuel cells.

The project, entitled, Development of materials for storage of hydrogen by means of physical adsorption.

At present, hydrogen production “is not a problem”. For some years now, hydrogen has been obtained by means of catalytic reforming or by the electrolysis of water. However, the question hanging over the use of hydrogen as a fuel is its generation or storage in the quantities required for a means of transport and without it being dangerous – as we are dealing with a highly inflammable gas. Under normal conditions hydrogen is in a gaseous state and thus has to be kept under high pressure or, if we wish to reduce the pressure, the storage temperature has to be lowered. These two circumstances give rise to technological difficulties, apart from the added safety ones.


There are various ways to store hydrogen: pressurised, liquid, absorbed into metals (as hydrides) and physiadsorbed in suitable materials. This last method, involving the “physical adsorption onto porous materials”, is what is being developed in this current research project, the end of which is projected for next year. In concrete, the study is being carried out employing nanoporous materials the pore size of which is in the range of 0 to 10-6 metres.

The mentioned research team has commenced work on three families of materials: activated carbons, zeolites and stacked clays. These materials fulfil four requisites: they have mechanical resistance and are safe, apart from being light and cheap.

Storage based on physiadsorbtion provides a potentially higher energy efficiency than the rest of the mentioned storage options, given that the hydrogen is retained at a low temperature and 100% of the hydrogen adsorbed can be recovered. The low boiling point of hydrogen (-253ēC) makes it necessary to employ temperatures pf about -196ēC in order to attain sufficient amount of adsorbed hydrogen. The freeing of the physiadsorbed hydrogen can be, moreover, a rapid process and can be carried out easily with small changes of pressure and/or temperature.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elhuyar Fundazioa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Adsorbent Materials For The Storage Of Hydrogen." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050627234007.htm>.
Elhuyar Fundazioa. (2005, June 28). Adsorbent Materials For The Storage Of Hydrogen. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050627234007.htm
Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Adsorbent Materials For The Storage Of Hydrogen." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050627234007.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Lithium Battery 'Holy Grail' Could Provide 4 Times The Power

Lithium Battery 'Holy Grail' Could Provide 4 Times The Power

Newsy (July 28, 2014) — Stanford University published its findings for a "pure" lithium ion battery that could have our everyday devices and electric cars running longer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

AP (July 28, 2014) — AP Investigation: As the Obama administration weans the country off dirty fuels, energy companies are ramping-up overseas coal exports at a heavy price. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shipping Crates Get New 'lease' On Life

Shipping Crates Get New 'lease' On Life

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 25, 2014) — Shipping containers have been piling up as America imports more than it exports. Some university students in Washington D.C. are set to get a first-hand lesson in recycling. Their housing is being built using refashioned shipping containers. Lily Jamali reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

AFP (July 25, 2014) — Europe's highest train, the little train of Artouste in the French Pyrenees, celebrates its 80th birthday. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins