Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

PET Can Identify Effectiveness Of Chemotherapy Early In High-risk Breast Cancer Patients

Date:
August 8, 2005
Source:
Society of Nuclear Medicine
Summary:
The effectiveness of chemotherapy in patients with advanced breast cancer can be evaluated earlier by using 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging over other conventional imaging procedures, according to an article in the July issue of the Society of Nuclear Medicine's Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

RESTON, Va.—The effectiveness of chemotherapy in patients with advanced breast cancer can be evaluated earlier by using 18F-FDGpositron emission tomography (PET) imaging over other conventionalimaging procedures, according to an article in the July issue of theSociety of Nuclear Medicine’s Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Related Articles


PET imaging performed at baseline and after the initiation oftreatment “allowed prediction of response as early as after the firstcycle of chemotherapy,” said Norbert Avril, M.D., chief of the divisionof nuclear medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center,Pittsburgh, Pa. Conventional imaging procedures, such as computedtomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plain filmradiography and ultrasound, do not reliably predict therapy responseearly in the course of treatment, explained the co-author of “EarlyPrediction of Response to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast CancerUsing Sequential 18F-FDG PET.”

Metastatic breast cancer is the most advanced stage of breastcancer. Cancer cells have spread past the breast and underarm lymphnodes to other areas of the body, continuing to grow, multiply andpossibly spread to other regions of the body. Chemotherapy, which usesdrugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cellsor stopping the cells from dividing, is typically used with patients.At this advanced stage of the disease, the aim of treatment is toimprove survival and quality of life, since the disease is generallynot curable, said Avril. It’s essential to identify those individualswho don’t respond to chemotherapy early “to avoid ineffective therapiesand unnecessary side effects,” he noted. This ability to individualizetreatment gives patients and physicians options not previouslyavailable, added Avril, indicating that additional studies are neededto determine how to use 18F-FDG PET in a clinical setting.

PET is a powerful medical imaging procedure that noninvasivelydemonstrates the function of organs and other tissues. It is usedprimarily as a diagnostic tool in cardiology, neurology, oncology andmany other medical specialties. To image cancer, a radiopharmaceuticalsuch as fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which includes both sugar(metabolized at a higher rate by cancer cells) and a radionuclide, isinjected into the patient. Because cancer cells metabolize sugar athigher rates than normal cells, the radiopharmaceutical is drawn inhigher concentrations to cancerous areas. The PET scan shows where theradiopharmaceutical is by tracking the gamma ray signals given off bythe radionuclides.

Avril co-wrote “Early Prediction of Response to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer Using Sequential 18F-FDGPET” with Joerg Dose Schwarz, M.D., Michael Bader, M.D., GabrieleHemminger, M.D., and Fritz Janicke, M.D., department of gynecology, andLars Jenicke, M.D., department of nuclear medicine, all at theUniversity Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society of Nuclear Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society of Nuclear Medicine. "PET Can Identify Effectiveness Of Chemotherapy Early In High-risk Breast Cancer Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050807235546.htm>.
Society of Nuclear Medicine. (2005, August 8). PET Can Identify Effectiveness Of Chemotherapy Early In High-risk Breast Cancer Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050807235546.htm
Society of Nuclear Medicine. "PET Can Identify Effectiveness Of Chemotherapy Early In High-risk Breast Cancer Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050807235546.htm (accessed February 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, February 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Newsy (Feb. 26, 2015) People who sleep more than eight hours per night are 45 percent more likely to have a stroke, according to a University of Cambridge study. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Forensic science, which has fascinated generations with its unravelling of gruesome crime mysteries, is being put under the microscope in an exhibition of real criminal investigations in London. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Couple Celebrates Identical Triplets

Michigan Couple Celebrates Identical Triplets

AP (Feb. 25, 2015) A suburban Detroit couple who have two older children are adjusting to life after becoming parents to identical triplets _ a multiple birth a doctor calls rare. (Feb. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) Washington&apos;s mayor says the District of Columbia will move forward with marijuana legalization, despite pushback from Congress. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins