Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nicotine Exposure Can Increase Motivation To Respond For Food Weeks After The Last Exposure

Date:
September 1, 2005
Source:
Yale University
Summary:
A study provides insight into one of the most vexing issues relating to smoking cessation, one that discourages many people from attempting to quit smoking, the prospect of weight gain.

New Haven, Conn.- A new study by Yale researchers shows that priornicotine exposure in mice can increase their motivation to workfor food, weeks after their last exposure to nicotine, a finding thatruns counter to the popular belief that nicotine exposure curbsappetite.

The study, to be published in an upcoming issue ofPsychopharmacology, also sheds new light on the role played by certainnicotinic acetylcholine receptors when it comes to the reinforcingaspects of nicotine.

The study provides insight into one of the most vexing issues relatingto smoking cessation, one that discourages many people from attemptingto quit smoking, the prospect of weight gain. "Although acute nicotinecan act as an appetite suppressant, these data are the first to suggestthat repeated exposure to nicotine has the opposite effect, thatnicotine increases motivation for food for weeks following exposure tothe drug," said Darlene Brunzell, associate research scientist in theDepartment of Psychiatry and first author of the study.

"This research suggests that when young people take up smoking toregulate their weight, this may be counterproductive in addition tobeing harmful to their health," said Stephanie O'Malley, professor ofpsychiatry and principal investigator for the Center for Nicotine &Tobacco Use Research at Yale. "More research is needed to determine howexactly that works, but this does show that there could be a connectionbetween exposure to nicotine and subsequent weight gain in someindividuals."

In addition, the study identifies which nicotinic receptors areinvolved in nicotine's control over cues. "We knew previously that cuesplay a critical role in nicotine and tobacco consumption in animals andhumans," said Brunzell. "These studies show that Beta 2 nicotinicreceptors are necessary for nicotine's ability to increase the controlthat cues have over behavior." said Dr. Darlene Brunzell, Ph.D., firstauthor of the study. he also said, in addition, that the findings runcounter to the popular belief that acute nicotine exposure curbsappetite. "These data are the first to suggest that repeated exposureto nicotine has the opposite effect, that nicotine increases motivationfor food for weeks following exposure to the drug."

O'Malley said that the research has significance when it comes todeveloping solutions for smokers who gain weight after they quitsmoking. She noted that weight concerns keep many people, particularlywomen, from attempting to quit. Any information about the mechanism forweight gain could help the researchers at Yale and elsewhere figure outhow to address that concern. In the meantime, she said, the researchmight help discourage people from starting to smoke to regulate theirweight.

###

For more information about CENTURY/TTURC, please see www.quitwithyale.org


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Yale University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Yale University. "Nicotine Exposure Can Increase Motivation To Respond For Food Weeks After The Last Exposure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050901073320.htm>.
Yale University. (2005, September 1). Nicotine Exposure Can Increase Motivation To Respond For Food Weeks After The Last Exposure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050901073320.htm
Yale University. "Nicotine Exposure Can Increase Motivation To Respond For Food Weeks After The Last Exposure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050901073320.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Magic Mushrooms' Could Help Smokers Quit

'Magic Mushrooms' Could Help Smokers Quit

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) In a small study, researchers found that the majority of long-time smokers quit after taking psilocybin pills and undergoing therapy sessions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Fat Shaming' Might Actually Cause Weight Gain

'Fat Shaming' Might Actually Cause Weight Gain

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) A study for University College London suggests obese people who are discriminated against gain more weight than those who are not. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins