Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

GABA Halts Stem Cell Production In The Brain

Date:
September 3, 2005
Source:
Yale University
Summary:
Release of the neurotransmitter GABA by adult neuronal precursor cells that develop into neurons limits stem cell proliferation.

New Haven, Conn.--Release of the neurotransmitter GABA by adultneuronal precursor cells that develop into neurons limits stem cellproliferation, according to a study at Yale School of Medicine in theSeptember issue of Nature Neuroscience.

Tight regulation of new cell growth in the adult brain is criticalsince uncontrolled proliferation can lead to devastating diseases, suchas cancer.

"The GABAergic signaling described in our paper allows aproper balance between stem cells and daughter cells, and preventsout-of-control proliferation of stem cells," said Angelique Bordey,assistant professor in the Departments of Neurosurgery and Cellular& Molecular Physiology, and senior author of the study. "The nextquestion we would like to answer is what would happen if this signalingwas disrupted in a living being."

Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of the brain arethought to give rise to glioma, or brain tumors, when theirproliferation is out of control, she said. "One of the goals of thisline of research is to find ways to promote neurogenesis in acontrolled manner, so identifying signaling pathways, factors andreceptors that block or promote neurogenesis is very important," Bordeysaid. "These factors and receptors provide additional sites forpharmaceutical targets to promote neurogenesis and self-renewal ofdying cells."

Alternatively, identifying negative GABAergic signaling onstem cell proliferation, as the researchers did in this study, suggeststhat any drugs that would enhance GABA's function may limitneurogenesis, she said.

"GABAergic drugs such as alcohol and benzodiazepines (somesleeping pills) have been used by a large number of individuals in oursociety and these drugs are expected to block stem cell proliferation,"Bordey said. "Such an impact of these drugs on neurogenesis and brainfunction would be the next step to investigate."

###

Co-authors include Xiuxin Liu and Qin Wang of Yale and Tarik Haydar of George Washington University School of Medicine.

Nature Neuroscience 8: 1179-1187 (September 2005)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Yale University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Yale University. "GABA Halts Stem Cell Production In The Brain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050902072541.htm>.
Yale University. (2005, September 3). GABA Halts Stem Cell Production In The Brain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050902072541.htm
Yale University. "GABA Halts Stem Cell Production In The Brain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050902072541.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins