Science News
from research organizations

Human Muscle-derived Stem Cells Effective In Animal Models Of Incontinence

Date:
September 2, 2005
Source:
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Summary:
Human muscle-derived cells, pluripotent stem cells found in muscle, have been used to cure stress urinary incontinence in animal models, a finding which signals that these cells are prime candidates to treat the condition in adults. The research will be presented by University of Pittsburgh researchers at the annual meeting of the International Continence Society Aug. 29 through Sept. 2 in Montreal.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

MONTREAL, Aug. 31 -- Human muscle-derived cells, pluripotent stem cellsfound in muscle, have been used to cure stress urinary incontinence inanimal models, a finding which signals that these cells are primecandidates to treat the condition in adults. The research will bepresented by University of Pittsburgh researchers at the annual meetingof the International Continence Society Aug. 29 through Sept. 2 inMontreal.

In the study, the Pittsburgh researchers led by Michael Chancellor,M.D., injected the human muscle-derived stem cells into theperiurethral muscle of a well-established animal model for stressurinary incontinence. After four weeks, the models' leak-pointpressure, the pressure at which urine would leak from the bladder, hadbeen restored to levels that would be seen normally.

"In past studies we have shown that muscle-derived cells fromrats have been able to restore deficient muscle in the bladder. Usinghuman muscle-derived cells was the next step in bringing this therapyto humans," said Dr. Chancellor, who is professor of urology at theUniversity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Researchers believe that the human muscle-derived cells wereable to restore leak-point pressure to normal levels by differentiatinginto new muscle fibers, which prevented periurethral muscle atrophy.They will be returning to the lab to identify exactly how these cellswork to regenerate muscle.

Clinical trials using muscle-derived cell therapy for incontinence have recently begun in Toronto.

Urinary incontinence affects 13 million Americans. Those withstress urinary incontinence involuntarily lose urine while doingactivities that put stress on the abdomen, such as laughing, sneezing,coughing, lifting or walking. A result of damage to the urethralsphincter, stress incontinence is most often caused by childbirth,menopause or pelvic surgery.

###

Results are published in abstract 2.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Human Muscle-derived Stem Cells Effective In Animal Models Of Incontinence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050902073119.htm>.
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (2005, September 2). Human Muscle-derived Stem Cells Effective In Animal Models Of Incontinence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050902073119.htm
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Human Muscle-derived Stem Cells Effective In Animal Models Of Incontinence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050902073119.htm (accessed September 2, 2015).

Share This Page: