Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

High Blood Sugar Levels A Risk Factor For Heart Disease

Date:
September 14, 2005
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Summary:
An elevated blood glucose level is the defining feature of diabetes, but until now it was unclear whether elevated glucose levels contributed independently to increasing heart-disease risk. Lowering blood sugar levels could reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in both diabetics and non-diabetics, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and other institutions.

Lowering blood sugar levels could reduce the risk of coronaryheart disease in both diabetics and non-diabetics, according toresearchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health andother institutions. The researchers found that Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)—ameasure of long-term blood glucose level—predicts heart disease risk inboth diabetics and non-diabetics. An elevated blood glucose level isthe defining feature of diabetes, but until now it was unclear whetherelevated glucose levels contributed independently to increasingheart-disease risk. The study is published in the September 12, 2005,issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

“In persons withdiabetes, we know that traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such ashypertension and high cholesterol, should be treated aggressively. Ourresults also suggest that improving blood-glucose control may furtherreduce heart disease risk,” said Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH, leadauthor of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in the Bloomberg Schoolof Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology. “For non-diabetics,lifestyle modifications, such as increased physical activity, weightloss and eating a healthful, low-glycemic, index diet rich in fiber,fruit and vegetables, may not only help prevent diabetes, but alsoreduce the risk of heart disease,” she said.

The researchers useddata from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), acommunity-based cohort of almost 16,000 people from four states—NorthCarolina, Mississippi, Maryland and Minnesota. HbA1c levels were takenfrom ARIC study participants during clinical examinations in 1990-1992.ARIC researchers tracked study participants for 10-12 years to acquirecoronary heart disease events, hospitalizations and deaths.

Inparticipants with diabetes, the researchers found a graded associationbetween HbA1c and increasing coronary heart disease risk. Each1-percentage-point increase in HbA1c level was associated with a 14percent increase in heart disease risk. According to the study authors,the current target for “good” glycemic control established by theAmerican Diabetes Association is an HbA1c value less than 7 percent.However, the researchers’ analyses suggest that heart disease riskbegins to increase at values even below 7 percent.

They foundthat those study participants without diabetes but who had “highnormal” HbA1c levels (approximately 5 percent to 6 percent) were at anincreased heart disease risk, even after accounting for other factorssuch as age, cholesterol level, blood pressure, body mass index andsmoking. Non-diabetic persons with HbA1c levels of 6 percent or higherhad almost a two-fold greater heart disease risk compared to personswith an HbA1c level below 4.6 percent.

“There are large, on-goingclinical trials which should definitively answer the question of theeffectiveness of blood glucose-lowering medications in decreasingcardiovascular risk in persons with type-2 diabetes. But our resultssuggest we should also be concerned about elevated blood sugar levelsin non-diabetics as well. An important next step is to investigatestrategies for lowering HbA1c in persons without diabetes,” said Selvin.

The study authors were supported in part by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Co-authorsof the study are Elizabeth Selvin, Josef Coresh, Sherita H. Golden,Frederick L. Brancati, Aaron R. Folsom and Michael W. Steffes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "High Blood Sugar Levels A Risk Factor For Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050914105425.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2005, September 14). High Blood Sugar Levels A Risk Factor For Heart Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050914105425.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "High Blood Sugar Levels A Risk Factor For Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050914105425.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins