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Penn Surgeons Use Completely Robotic Surgery To Treat Prostate Cancer

Date:
October 7, 2005
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death among American men. It is estimated that one in six males will develop the disease during his lifetime. However, promising new treatment options have been developed to help combat this threatening disease. One of the most innovative of these treatments is robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (removal of the prostate). The University of Pennsylvania Health System is currently one of only a handful of facilities across the country offering this minimally invasive, high-tech treatment.

At the console, David I. Lee, MD, operates the four robotic arms, which include movable "wrists," using hand and foot controls. One of the robotic arms holds a tiny video camera, one works as a retractor and the other two replicate the surgeon's exact hand movements.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

One of the most innovative of thesetreatments is robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (removal ofthe prostate). The University of Pennsylvania Health System iscurrently one of only a handful of facilities across the countryoffering this minimally invasive, high-tech treatment. David I. Lee,M.D., a national expert in robotic surgery, was recruited to Penn andnamed Chief of the Division of Urology at Penn Presbyterian MedicalCenter, where the robotic prostate program is based.

There aremany factors that make robotics an exceptionally valuable tool in theoperating room during prostate surgery, for both the patient andsurgeon. “Perhaps two of the most-feared possible long-term effects ofa radical prostatectomy are erectile dysfunction and urinaryincontinence,” says Dr. Lee. “My specially-trained team and I havediscovered that by using the robotic technique there is greater nervesparing, which provides patients with the best chance for maintainingpotency and continence.”

Robotic technology offers a number ofadvantages during surgery. For instance, the robotic “arms” filter evenminute tremors of the human hand so to provide steadiness. The robot’scamera also provides a three-dimensional, stereoscopic image of thebody’s interior, as opposed to a two-dimensional image on a flatscreen. This improved perspective enables depth perception thatsharpens the visualization of the prostate and the network of nervesand tissue surrounding it. Additionally, by scaling down the motion ofthe robotic instruments, the surgeon can perform extremely precise,intricate movements during the procedure. For example, if the surgeon’shand moves five centimeters, he/she can scale the robotic hand to moveonly one centimeter.

Robotic technology also offers a number ofadvantages after surgery. Because laparoscopic surgery is minimallyinvasive and no large incisions are involved, robotic-assisted surgeryprovides numerous benefits for prostate cancer patients, including:less pain and scarring, diminished blood loss, a shorter hospital stayand reduced recovery period for a quicker return to daily activities.

Theactual robot consists of a tower that manipulates instrumentscontrolled from a console that is situated a few feet from the patient.At the console, the surgeon operates four robotic “arms” and “wrists”using hand and foot controls. One of the robotic arms holds a tinyvideo camera, one works as a retractor and the other two replicate thesurgeon’s exact hand movements. The camera and instruments are insertedthrough small keyhole incisions in the patient’s abdomen. The surgeonthen directs the robotic instruments to dissect the prostate gland andsurrounding tissue.

Unlike standard laparoscopic approaches thatrequire counter-intuitive movements by surgeons (whereby the surgeonmust move his hand to the left in order to move the mechanical deviceto the right), the robotic technology affords surgeons the direct,“intuitive” control they exercise in traditional open surgicalprocedures, seamlessly translating their natural hand, wrist and fingermovements at the console into corresponding micro-movements oflaparoscopic surgical instruments inside the patient’s body.

Pennhas been using fully robotic surgery for cardiac patients for the pastthree years and is currently studying its use for head and neck cancersurgeries. “The robotic prostate program is a continuation of Penn’scommitment to finding and applying the most precise, most beneficialsurgical techniques to put patients on a quicker road to recovery withbetter outcomes,” said Dr. Lee.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Penn Surgeons Use Completely Robotic Surgery To Treat Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 October 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051007083704.htm>.
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (2005, October 7). Penn Surgeons Use Completely Robotic Surgery To Treat Prostate Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051007083704.htm
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Penn Surgeons Use Completely Robotic Surgery To Treat Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051007083704.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

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