Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Avian Influenza Infection In Birds Spreads To Turkey, Romania

Date:
October 17, 2005
Source:
World Health Organization
Summary:
Tests conducted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) have today confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in samples taken from domestic birds in Turkey. In Romania, investigations of recent poultry deaths have, to date, identified the H5 subtype of avian influenza virus.

Tests conducted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) have today confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in samples taken from domestic birds in Turkey.

In Romania, investigations of recent poultry deaths have, to date, identified the H5 subtype of avian influenza virus. Further testing is under way to determine the strain and whether the virus is highly pathogenic. Authorities in the two countries have undertaken control measures as recommended by OIE and FAO. WHO is sending diagnostic reagents and other supplies to support testing in national laboratories. Viruses from both outbreaks have been sent for further analysis to the Central Veterinary Laboratory Agency-Weybridge (UK), which is an OIE/FAO reference laboratory. Viruses are also being sent to WHO reference laboratories for comparison with human H5N1 isolates from Asia.

Public health implications

The spread of H5N1 to poultry in new areas is of concern as it increases opportunities for further human cases to occur. However, all evidence to date indicates that the H5N1 virus does not spread easily from birds to infect humans. WHO advises countries experiencing outbreaks in poultry to follow certain precautions, particularly during culling operations, and to monitor persons with a possible exposure history for fever or respiratory symptoms. The early symptoms of H5N1 infection mimic those of many other common respiratory illnesses, meaning that false alarms are likely.

The WHO level of pandemic alert remains unchanged at phase 3: a virus new to humans is causing infections, but does not spread easily from one person to another.

WHO continues to recommend that travellers to areas experiencing outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 in poultry should avoid contact with live animal markets and poultry farms. Large amounts of the virus are known to be excreted in the droppings from infected birds. Populations in affected countries are advised to avoid contact with dead migratory birds or wild birds showing signs of disease.

Direct contact with infected poultry, or surfaces and objects contaminated by their droppings, is considered the main route of human infection. Exposure risk is considered highest during slaughter, defeathering, butchering, and preparation of poultry for cooking. There is no evidence that properly cooked poultry or poultry products can be a source of infection.

Countries located along migratory routes need to be vigilant for signs of disease in wild and domestic birds. Recent events make it likely that some migratory birds are now implicated in the direct spread of the H5N1 virus in its highly pathogenic form.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by World Health Organization. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

World Health Organization. "Avian Influenza Infection In Birds Spreads To Turkey, Romania." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 October 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051017071256.htm>.
World Health Organization. (2005, October 17). Avian Influenza Infection In Birds Spreads To Turkey, Romania. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051017071256.htm
World Health Organization. "Avian Influenza Infection In Birds Spreads To Turkey, Romania." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051017071256.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Kangaroo Rescued from Swimming Pool

Raw: Kangaroo Rescued from Swimming Pool

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A kangaroo was saved from drowning in a backyard suburban swimming pool in Australia's Victoria state on Thursday. Australian broadcaster Channel 7 showed footage of the kangaroo struggling to get out of the pool. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Marijuana Use Lead To Serious Heart Problems?

Could Marijuana Use Lead To Serious Heart Problems?

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) A new study says marijuana use could lead to serious heart-related complications. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins