Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Exercise May Ward Off Death In Women With Metabolic Syndrome

Date:
November 14, 2005
Source:
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Summary:
A high level of fitness may extend the lives of women with metabolic syndrome, according to new findings presented today by a cardiologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital at the annual American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

A high level of fitness may extend the lives of women with metabolic syndrome, according to new findings presented today by a cardiologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital at the annual American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Related Articles


Researchers followed nearly 6,000 women who had no signs of heart disease when the study launched in 1992. Over the next nine years, those with metabolic syndrome were 57 percent more likely to die than those who didn't have the cluster of risk factors that defines metabolic syndrome. But when researchers controlled the study for women with metabolic syndrome who had higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, this elevated risk nearly disappeared -- both overall deaths and deaths specific to heart disease fell to rates similar to those of the group of women without metabolic syndrome.

"Through some mechanism, cardiorespiratory fitness may be protective against the adverse effects of metabolic syndrome," says lead researcher Martha Gulati, MD, co-director of the Center for Women's Health at the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute of Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Fitness has a protective effect, likely because it reduces other risk factors, lowers heart rate and conditions the heart to respond to stress."

Cardiorespiratory fitness can be determined by measuring the maximal oxygen uptake for a given workload and can be expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs). One MET is defined as the energy it takes to sit quietly. This study defined higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness as women who are able to perform activities at greater than 8 METs (approximate to being able to run a mile in 12 minutes or faster).

Metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, is defined as having three or more of the following risk factors: a waist circumference of greater than 35 inches in women; high blood pressure; elevated triglycerides; low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL); or high fasting glucose levels.

In August of this year, a related study by Dr. Gulati was published in the New England Journal of Medicine which found that otherwise healthy women whose exercise capacity was less than 85 percent the age-predicted value had twice the risk of death compared to women reaching at least 85 percent. "Our findings should provide an added incentive for women, with and without metabolic syndrome, to start working out," Gulati said. "In many aspects, women can take control over their own health and longevity and exercise is one of the keys."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Exercise May Ward Off Death In Women With Metabolic Syndrome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051114215251.htm>.
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. (2005, November 14). Exercise May Ward Off Death In Women With Metabolic Syndrome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051114215251.htm
Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Exercise May Ward Off Death In Women With Metabolic Syndrome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051114215251.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins