Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Fighting Advanced Melanoma: Could A 'Personalized Vaccine' Be The Solution?

Date:
December 12, 2005
Source:
Saint Louis University
Summary:
Saint Louis University is one of two sites in the country to study the effectiveness of an experimental, personalized vaccine in treating advanced melanoma. The vaccine fuses a patient’s own melanoma cells with his own dendritic cells, which help the immune system to recognize cancer cells, to create a treatment designed to fight the patient’s specific melanoma.

Saint Louis University is one of two sites in the country to study the effectiveness of an experimental, personalized vaccine in treating advanced melanoma.

Related Articles


The vaccine fuses a patient’s own melanoma cells with his own dendritic cells, which help the immune system to recognize cancer cells, to create a treatment designed to fight the patient’s specific melanoma.

“Generic vaccines might not work for everyone. When we fuse a patient’s own tumor cell with cells from his own immune system, we hope to create a potent vaccine to cure cancer,” says Eddy Hsueh, M.D., principal investigator of the trial and associate professor of surgery at Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

“We know from animal studies that if you fused the tumor cells with dendritic cells, the animal’s immune system detects the presence of tumor antigens, which are signal molecules on the tumor, so it can eradicate the established tumor.”

Saint Louis University will recruit 26 volunteers who have stage III or stage IV melanoma for the trial. Those who are eligible must be at least 18 years of age and have melanoma that can’t be surgical removed in entirety.

Dr. Hsueh will extract immune cells and surgically remove tumor cells, and send them to Cleveland Clinic Foundation, where they will be prepared to be injected as a vaccine. The tumor cells are killed so they can’t create more tumors. The treatment is called a vaccine because it works by stimulating the body’s immune system to attack melanoma.

Patients will receive 11 treatments at Saint Louis University Cancer Center. Injections will be given every two weeks for the first five visits, then every month for a total of six months. Every patient will get a melanoma vaccine that is custom-created to fight the particular cancer in his or her body.

“We have very convincing data from animal studies, and this is the first step in testing how effective this type of vaccine is in humans,” Hsueh says. “In almost every mouse that was treated, cancer was cured.”

The University of Michigan is the other university participating in the research.

Established in 1836, Saint Louis University School of Medicine has the distinction of awarding the first M.D. degree west of the Mississippi River. Saint Louis University School of Medicine is a pioneer in geriatric medicine, organ transplantation, chronic disease prevention, cardiovascular disease, neurosciences and vaccine research, among others. The School of Medicine trains physicians and biomedical scientists, conducts medical research, and provides health services on a local, national and international level.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Saint Louis University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Saint Louis University. "Fighting Advanced Melanoma: Could A 'Personalized Vaccine' Be The Solution?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 December 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051212163856.htm>.
Saint Louis University. (2005, December 12). Fighting Advanced Melanoma: Could A 'Personalized Vaccine' Be The Solution?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051212163856.htm
Saint Louis University. "Fighting Advanced Melanoma: Could A 'Personalized Vaccine' Be The Solution?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051212163856.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins