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Researchers Open Door To Potential Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Date:
May 30, 2006
Source:
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Summary:
Researchers funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) have identified an unsuspected role of a protein named SHP-1 that could constitute a new therapeutic path against Type 2 Diabetes.

Researchers funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) have identified an unsuspected role of a protein named SHP-1 that could constitute a new therapeutic path against Type 2 Diabetes.

Under the direction of professor Andrι Marette (Laval University), Nicole Beauchemin (McGill University), Martin Oliver (McGill University Health Centre) and Katherine Siminovitch (University of Toronto) were part of a Canadian and American team which published an article in the May issue of Nature Medicine that explains the role of SHP-1 in the control of blood glucose.

The researchers already knew that SHP-1 played a role in regulating the immune system. However, no one had previously taken the time to verify if this protein was involved in the regulation of metabolism. This is precisely what this team of Canadian and American researchers did, thanks to a series of mutant or genetically modified mice producing little or no SHP-1.

"Our results indicate that these mice are extremely sensitive to insulin and, consequently, they are very effective in metabolising glucose at the level of the liver and the muscles," notes Andrι Marette. In addition, the researchers highlighted that SHP-1 inhibits the decomposition of insulin by the liver. "This could explain the increase in the insulin concentrations of certain metabolic disorders associated with obesity," indicates the researcher.

"The results of Andre Marette and his team represent an important step in the development of a new therapeutic approach in the fight against diabetes. Advances in the treatment of diabetes are needed to improve the lives of the more than two million Canadians already affected by it and the many more who will develop the disease in the years to come. The study is a perfect example of the potential benefits of investing in health research," says Dr. Diane Finegood, based in Vancouver and Scientific Director of the CIHR Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes.

"By inhibiting the activity of SHP-1, it would perhaps be possible to restore better control of blood glucose," suggests professor Marette. The difficulty, however, is to reach that point without blocking the essential part played by this protein in the immune system. The SHP-1 protein is present in humans, but its role in the regulation of the metabolism of glucose and in the development of Type 2 Diabetes remains to be shown.

"Good glucose control is essential for managing diabetes and preventing the debilitating complications associated with diabetes," says Dr. Paula Dworatzek, Senior Research Associate, Canadian Diabetes Association. "We congratulate Dr. Marette and his team for these initial findings, which will pave the way for his team and others to pursue a potential new therapy in the management of diabetes."

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada's agency for health research. CIHR's mission is to create new scientific knowledge and to catalyze its translation into improved health, more effective health services and products, and a strengthened Canadian health care system. Composed of 13 Institutes, CIHR provides leadership and support to over 10,000 health researchers and trainees across Canada. www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca

The Canadian Diabetes Association works to prevent diabetes and improve the quality of life for those affected, through research, education, service and advocacy. With a presence in more than 150 communities, the Canadian Diabetes Association's strong network of assistance includes volunteers, employees, healthcare professionals and partners. The Canadian Diabetes Association - Know who to turn to.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Canadian Institutes of Health Research. "Researchers Open Door To Potential Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 May 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060530084513.htm>.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research. (2006, May 30). Researchers Open Door To Potential Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060530084513.htm
Canadian Institutes of Health Research. "Researchers Open Door To Potential Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060530084513.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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