Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Supercomputers To Transform Science

Date:
June 8, 2006
Source:
University of Bristol
Summary:
New insights into the structure of space and time, climate modeling, and the design of novel drugs, are but a few of the many research areas that will be transformed by the installation of three supercomputers at the University of Bristol.

Simulation of Higgs decay in the CMS detector of the Large Hadron Collider.
Credit: Image CERN

New insights into the structure of space and time, climate modeling, and the design of novel drugs, are but a few of the many research areas that will be transformed by the installation of three supercomputers at the University of Bristol.

At peak performance the multi-million pound high performance computers (HPCs) will carry out over 13 trillion calculations per second. That is equivalent to the entire population of the world working simultaneously on hand-held calculators for about three hours.

“This initiative puts Bristol at the forefront of high performance computing”, said Professor David May, Head of Computer Science. “The HPC impact will be enormous – right across all disciplines – turning data into knowledge. It will influence both research and teaching. Universities that understand this will be the most competitive in the 21st century”.

The University today announced the award of the contract to install the computers to a consortium led by ClusterVision, working with IBM and ClearSpeed Technology. The largest of the three HPCs will be one of the fastest University research computers in the UK, and is expected to be one of the top 100 computers of its type in the world.

Dr David Newbold, physicist, explained how the new HPC cluster will allow the University’s physicists to be amongst the first to examine results from the Large Hadron Collider, the world's largest particle collider which is set to provide new insights into the structure of space and time and the origin of mass.

Professor Paul Valdes, climatologist, said: “This is an incredibly exciting development. These HPCs will allow us to develop a new generation of numerical models that have a much more sophisticated representation of the climate system. This will give everyone much greater confidence in the regional predictions of future climate change.”

Professor Steve Wiggins, Head of Mathematics and a co-instigator of the project, stated that “HPC has ascended to a new level of importance. Any university that aspires to be world-class must have this basic research infrastructure. In future HPC will be an indispensable tool in every good researchers’ toolbox. The University of Bristol is leading the way.”

ClusterVision will supply, deliver, install the hardware and support the three clusters which will all run the ClusterVisionOSTM cluster suite of management and monitoring tools. Access to the computers will be available across the University’s dedicated campus research network.

“The solution put forward by ClusterVision, IBM and ClearSpeed was the best overall and in line with the University’s research and development requirements,” said Dr Ian Stewart, who co-ordinated the procurement at Bristol. “In addition to firmly establishing the University as one of the top High Performance Computing centers worldwide, the access to new innovative technology provided by IBM and ClearSpeed will maintain the University’s leading position in delivering groundbreaking research.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Bristol. "Supercomputers To Transform Science." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 June 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060606224636.htm>.
University of Bristol. (2006, June 8). Supercomputers To Transform Science. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060606224636.htm
University of Bristol. "Supercomputers To Transform Science." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060606224636.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Scientists in Tokyo have demonstrated what they say is the world's first 3D projection that floats in mid air. A laser that fires a pulse up to a thousand times a second superheats molecules in the air, creating a spark which can be guided to certain points in the air to shape what the human eye perceives as an image. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google To Protect Against Piracy ... At A Cost

Google To Protect Against Piracy ... At A Cost

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Google is changing its search-engine results to protect content producers from piracy — for a price. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Microsoft will reportedly release a smartwatch that works across different mobile platforms, has a two-day battery life and tracks heart rate. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Spotify Family A Great Deal Or Catching Up?

Is Spotify Family A Great Deal Or Catching Up?

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Spotify Family lets you add a family member to your account for half price. Although users are excited, it's a move competitors have already made. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins