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Scientists Discover Memory Molecule

Date:
September 3, 2006
Source:
SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Summary:
Scientists have succeeded in erasing memory in animal models. These findings may be useful for the treatment of disorders characterized by the pathological over-strengthening of synaptic connections, such as neuropathic pain, phantom limb syndrome, dystonia and post-traumatic stress.

Scientists at SUNY Downstate Medical Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that maintains memories in the brain. In an article in Science magazine, they demonstrate that by inhibiting the molecule they can erase long-term memories, much as you might erase a computer disc.

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Furthermore, erasing the memory from the brain does not prevent the ability to re-learn the memory, much as a cleaned computer disc may be re-used. This finding may some day have applications in treating chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, and memory loss, among other conditions.

The SUNY Downstate researchers reported in the August 25 issue of Science that an enzyme molecule called “protein kinase M zeta” preserves long-term memories through persistent strengthening of synaptic connections between neurons. This is analogous to the mechanism storing information as 0’s and 1’s in a computer’s hard disc. By inhibiting the enzyme, scientists were able to erase a memory that had been stored for one day, or even one month. This function in memory storage is specific to protein kinase M zeta, because inhibiting related molecules did not disrupt memory.

These findings may be useful for the treatment of disorders characterized by the pathological over-strengthening of synaptic connections, such as neuropathic pain, phantom limb syndrome, dystonia, and post-traumatic stress. Conversely, the identification of the core molecular mechanism for memory storage may focus effort on the development of specific therapeutic agents that enhance memory persistence and prevent memory loss. Earlier this year, SUNY Downstate scientists reported that PKMzeta was bound up in the tangles of Alzheimer's disease, thus perhaps blocking its function in memory storage.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

SUNY Downstate Medical Center. "Scientists Discover Memory Molecule." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060830204206.htm>.
SUNY Downstate Medical Center. (2006, September 3). Scientists Discover Memory Molecule. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060830204206.htm
SUNY Downstate Medical Center. "Scientists Discover Memory Molecule." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060830204206.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

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