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Sperm Banks Unpopular With Patients -- Researchers Investigate Why

Date:
October 6, 2006
Source:
McGill University
Summary:
Sperm banks are unpopular, even with patients suffering from cancer and facing treatments that may make them infertile. A new study led by McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) researcher Dr. Peter Chan examines why sperm banks are such an underused resource.

Sperm banks are unpopular, even with patients suffering from cancer and facing treatments that may make them infertile. A new study led by McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) researcher Dr. Peter Chan examines why sperm banks are such an underused resource.

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The new study published in a recent issue of the scientific journal Human Reproduction highlights the need to improve doctor-patient communication about the benefits of sperm banking, and the need for accurate and personalized information about the high risk of infertility associated with treatment for testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma. It also reveals that Quebecers are less likely than patients of immigrant descent to choose sperm banking as an option to father children in the future.

Testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma are among the most common malignancies to affect young men of reproductive age. "Testicular cancer accounts for over 25 per cent of all cancers diagnosed in men aged 20-24 years, and Hodgkin's lymphoma accounts for about 15 per cent in the same age group," says Dr. Peter Chan, Director of Male Reproductive Medicine at the MUHC, and senior author of the new study. Medical advances have made both malignancies highly curable, but one concern that remains for patients is their high risk of infertility.

"Sperm banking is the best hope for cancer patients that may wish to father children in the future," says Dr. Chan. Despite this, sperm banking remains underutilized. "We wanted to investigate this issue in the hope that our findings could be used to assist health care professionals promote sperm banking to their patients," says Dr. Chan.

The study, which involved in-depth interviews with cancer survivors and health care professionals, identified several factors as having an impact on sperm banking. Naturally the desire to become a father, current fatherhood status, the influence of a parent or partner, and the attitude towards survival, affected whether a patient chose to sperm bank.

"We discovered a need for improvement in the way health care professionals present information about sperm banking to patients," says Dr. Chan. "The study also highlighted the need for accurate and personalized information about the high risk of infertility associated with treatment for testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma."

Interestingly, cost was not a major consideration in most cases, despite the fact that private clinics charge between $200-500 Ca per year to bank sperm. Interestingly the study also revealed that Quebecers are less likely than patients of immigrant descent to choose sperm banking as an option to father children in the future.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by McGill University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

McGill University. "Sperm Banks Unpopular With Patients -- Researchers Investigate Why." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061005222426.htm>.
McGill University. (2006, October 6). Sperm Banks Unpopular With Patients -- Researchers Investigate Why. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061005222426.htm
McGill University. "Sperm Banks Unpopular With Patients -- Researchers Investigate Why." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061005222426.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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