Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Popular Anti-aging Supplement Has No Beneficial Effects, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

Date:
October 19, 2006
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
A widely used anti-aging supplement has no effect on aging markers such as muscle strength, peak endurance, muscle mass, fat mass and glucose tolerance in elderly men and women, according to Mayo Clinic researchers. The findings from their two-year study appear in the Oct. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

A widely used antiaging supplement has no effect on aging markers such as muscle strength, peak endurance, muscle mass, fat mass and glucose tolerance in elderly men and women, according to Mayo Clinic researchers. The findings from their two-year study appear in the Oct. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The findings serve to dispel the belief that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sold extensively as an antiaging supplement in health and grocery stores, can reverse age-related alterations in body composition and function, says the study's lead author K. Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Mayo Clinic endocrinologist.

"For almost two years we restored DHEA in older men and women to the high normal levels that are usually observed in young people, but found no beneficial effects on age-related changes in body composition and function," Dr. Nair says. "No beneficial effects on quality of life were observed. There's no evidence based on this study that DHEA has an antiaging effect."

The double blind study involved 87 men and 57 women who were followed for two years. Participants showed no change in several markers of aging -- body composition, physical performance, insulin sensitivity or quality of life.

Mayo Clinic's findings contradict some of the previous reports on DHEA. Dr. Nair says many former studies were done over shorter periods of time and didn't involve a large enough group of subjects. Mayo's study also was strengthened because it was a double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. DHEA was administered only to people with low DHEA and testosterone levels.

Dr. Nair calls DHEA use a controversial issue, as antiaging supplements drive sales in the health food industry. He advises elderly people to stop using DHEA because it is unlikely to offer any antiaging effect.

DHEA has been promoted as an antiaging supplement, say the study's authors, in part because high levels of DHEA have been associated with longevity in humans and nonhuman primates. But studies involving rodents aren't applicable to humans, as rodents have very low levels of DHEA, the authors say.

The study also involved administering low-dose testosterone to elderly men who had low testosterone. The authors found testosterone offered minimal beneficial effects on bone density, and far less than those offered by many current accepted therapies. Investigators found no negative side effects, although they caution that the study was conducted only in men without prostate problems.

The New England Journal of Medicine published an accompanying editorial to Mayo's study, with Paul Stewart, M.D., of the University of Birmingham, Ala., saying the search for eternal youth will continue. But in light of the Mayo findings, he suggests DHEA should no longer be accepted as a food supplement and should instead be treated as a regulated drug.

"Appropriate regulation would dispel much of the quackery associated with this elusive hormone," Dr. Stewart writes.

Mayo's study was conducted by the study team without industry support.

The study's other authors are Robert Rizza, M.D.; Peter O'Brien, Ph.D.; Ketan Dhatariya, M.D.; Kevin Short, Ph.D.; Ajay Nehra, M.D.; Janet Vittone, M.D.; George Klee, M.D., Ph.D.; Ananda Basu, M.B.B.S.; Rita Basu, M.D.; Claudio Cobelli, Ph.D.; Gianna Toffolo, Ph.D.; Chiara Dalla Man, Ph.D.; Donald Tindall, Ph.D.; L.J. Melton, III, M.D.; Glenn Smith, Ph.D.; Sundeep Khosla, M.D.; and Michael Jensen, M.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Popular Anti-aging Supplement Has No Beneficial Effects, Mayo Clinic Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061019094231.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2006, October 19). Popular Anti-aging Supplement Has No Beneficial Effects, Mayo Clinic Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061019094231.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Popular Anti-aging Supplement Has No Beneficial Effects, Mayo Clinic Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061019094231.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins