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Significant Amount Of Binge Eating Occurs In Restaurants

Date:
October 26, 2006
Source:
SAGE Publications
Summary:
Contradicting the common perception that binge eating is typically done in private, a significant amount of bingeing occurs in restaurants -- according to a recent study published in the November issue of SAGE Publications' Western Journal of Nursing Research. In the United States, large portion sizes, the increased frequency of eating out, fast-food consumption and sedentary lifestyle, all contribute to the development of obesity.
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Contradicting the common perception that binge eating is typically done in private, a significant amount of bingeing occurs in restaurants -- according to a recent study published in the November issue of SAGE Publications' Western Journal of Nursing Research (WJNR).

In the United States, large portion sizes, the increased frequency of eating out, fast food consumption, and sedentary lifestyle, all contribute to the development of obesity. But little is known about the restaurant eating habits of those who binge eat, (the uncontrolled consumption of large amounts of food without purging). In an effort to understand how the restaurant environment affects binge eaters, and to improve future interventions, this study looked at the eating behaviors of binge eaters -- compared to dieters -- when dining out.

The study, funded by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institute of Health, asked female binge eaters and dieters to record their daily food intake. The study showed that, not only did both groups consume more calories and fat on days they ate out, it also revealed that about 30% of binges occurred at restaurants. Binge eaters were likely to perceive their restaurant eating as uncontrolled and excessive. This contradicts the perception that binge eating takes place in private.

"Obesity experts continue to search for solutions to the epidemic of obesity," writes WJNR editor, Gayle M. Timmerman, author of the article. "The trend to eat at restaurants continues to rise. This frequent dining out, along with the consumption of additional calories, could contribute to weight gain over time. Restaurants are high-risk food environments that may exacerbate uncontrolled eating and excessive intake."

The article "Restaurant Eating in Nonpurge Binge-Eating Women" by the Western Journal of Nursing Research editor, Gayle M. Timmerman of the University of Texas at Austin, can be accessed at no charge for a limited time at http://wjnr.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/28/7/811.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by SAGE Publications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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SAGE Publications. "Significant Amount Of Binge Eating Occurs In Restaurants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061025185641.htm>.
SAGE Publications. (2006, October 26). Significant Amount Of Binge Eating Occurs In Restaurants. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061025185641.htm
SAGE Publications. "Significant Amount Of Binge Eating Occurs In Restaurants." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061025185641.htm (accessed August 5, 2015).

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