Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Web-based System Leads To Better, More Timely Data

Date:
October 29, 2006
Source:
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Summary:
After two years of work, an innovative project using web-based technologies to speed researcher access to a large body of new scientific data has demonstrated that not only access to but also the quality of the data has improved markedly. The data-entry process for the web-enabled ThermoML thermodynamics global data exchange catches and corrects data errors in roughly ten percent of journal articles entered in the system.

After two years of work, an innovative project using Web-based technologies to speed researcher access to a large body of new scientific data has demonstrated that not only access to but also the quality of the data has improved markedly. A new paper* on the Web-enabled ThermoML thermodynamics global data exchange standard notes that the data-entry process catches and corrects data errors in roughly 10 percent of journal articles entered in the system.

Related Articles


A landmark partnership between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), several major scientific journals and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), ThermoML was developed to deal with the explosive growth in published data on thermodynamics. Thermodynamics is essential to understanding and designing chemical reactions in everything from huge industrial chemical plants to the biochemistry of individual cells in the body. With improvements in measurement technology, the quantity of published thermophysical and thermochemical data has been almost doubling every 10 years.

This vast flood of information not only presents a basic problem for researchers and engineers--how to find the data they need when they need it.-- but also has strained the traditional scientific peer-review and validation process. "Despite the peer-review process, problems in data validation have led, in many instances, to publication of data that are grossly erroneous and, at times, inconsistent with the fundamental laws of nature," the authors note.

The ThermoML project began as an attempt to simplify and speed the delivery of new thermodynamic data from producers to users. The system has three major components -- ThermoML itself, an IUPAC data format standard based on XML (a generic data formatting standard) customized for storing thermodynamic data; Software tools developed at the NIST Thermodynamic Research Center (TRC) to simplify entering data into the system in formats close to those used by the original journal documents, displaying it in various formats and performing basic data integrity checks; and The ThermoData Engine, a sophisticated expert system developed at NIST, that can generate on demand recommended, evaluated data based on the existing experimental and predicted data and their uncertainties.

Authors writing for five major journals that are partners in the program, the Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, the Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics, Fluid Phase Equilibria, Thermochimica Acta, and the International Journal of Thermophysics, participate in the process by submitting the data for their articles using GDC software (available from NIST). The data are evaluated, and any potential inconsistencies reported back to the authors for verification. Based on two years of experience and some 1,000 articles, the authors write, an estimated 10 percent of articles reporting experimental thermodynamic data for organic compounds contain some erroneous information that would be "extremely difficult" to detect through the normal peer-review process.

More information on ThermoML can be found at http://trc.nist.gov/ThermoML.html.

*M. Frenkel et al. New global communication process in thermodynamics: impact on quality of published experimental data.. J. Chem. Inf. Model. ASAP Article. Web Release Date: October 11, 2006. http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi/jceaax/2003/48/i01/abs/je025645o.html


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute of Standards and Technology. "New Web-based System Leads To Better, More Timely Data." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061027183854.htm>.
National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2006, October 29). New Web-based System Leads To Better, More Timely Data. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061027183854.htm
National Institute of Standards and Technology. "New Web-based System Leads To Better, More Timely Data." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061027183854.htm (accessed March 30, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Computers & Math News

Monday, March 30, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Facebook Building Plane-Sized Drones For Global Internet

Facebook Building Plane-Sized Drones For Global Internet

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) Facebook on Thursday revealed more details about its Internet-connected drone project. The drone is bigger than a 737, but lighter than a car. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Returns from International Space Station and Sets Two Guinness World Records

Robot Returns from International Space Station and Sets Two Guinness World Records

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Mar. 27, 2015) The companion robot "Kirobo" returns to earth from the International Space Station and sets two Guinness World Records. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Bracelet Changes Design With the Touch of a Button

Smart Bracelet Changes Design With the Touch of a Button

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 27, 2015) Interactive jewellery that allows users to change designs and doesn&apos;t need charging. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Twitter's Periscope New Rival for Meerkat

Twitter's Periscope New Rival for Meerkat

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 26, 2015) Twitter has unveiled Periscope, its live-streaming app to rival Meerkat and other emerging apps that have captured the attention of the social media industry. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins