Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Breast Cancer Treatment Procedure Gives Women More Options

Date:
November 30, 2006
Source:
Radiological Society of North America
Summary:
A new minimally invasive approach to partial breast irradiation provides another treatment option for women with breast cancer. The researchers presented their findings at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

A new minimally invasive approach to partial breast irradiation provides another treatment option for women with breast cancer. The researchers presented their findings at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

"Women with breast cancer have many serious decisions to make in a short amount of time, including decisions regarding radiation therapy," said Lora D. Barke, D.O., assistant professor at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University and Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. "This procedure, which uses ultrasound to precisely guide balloon catheter placement to the lumpectomy site for partial breast irradiation treatment, removes one weighty decision women must make before surgery."

This is the first study to assess the use of ultrasound to guide the placement of the balloon catheter before partial breast irradiation therapy with brachytherapy.

In treatment with breast brachytherapy, the cancerous breast lump is surgically excised, and radiation is directed only to the portion of the breast surrounding the lumpectomy site. This approach maintains the likelihood of destroying the tumor but reduces the risk of damaging healthy tissue far from the tumor site. Since the target is smaller, brachytherapy allows for a shorter treatment regime--averaging five to seven days, compared to conventional whole-breast, external beam radiation, which may take six to seven weeks.

Balloon catheters used to deliver radiation to the affected area with brachytherapy are sometimes placed during surgery, or a surgical incision is reopened to insert the catheter. Often the catheter is placed unnecessarily, because later findings reveal that localized radiation is not appropriate or the breast tissue overlying the balloon is too thin.

"Our research shows that immediate placement of the balloon catheter is unnecessary and may add to cost. Radiologists can wait until receiving the final pathology, and then safely and efficiently insert the catheter with ultrasound guidance immediately before the patient begins brachytherapy," Dr. Barke explained. "This allows time to determine if brachytherapy is appropriate for the patient and allows the patient and physician to consider and weigh the benefits of various treatment options," she said.

The researchers studied ultrasound guidance of balloon catheter placement into the lumpectomy cavities of 75 new patients with early-stage breast cancer seven to 47 days after their lumpectomies. Patients were initially screened to assure an adequate surgical cavity size and skin thickness over the balloon. After successful insertion of the catheter, patients received twice-a-day brachytherapy treatments for one week.

The investigators concluded that ultrasound-guided placement of partial breast irradiation balloon catheters is safe, efficient and minimally invasive. No immediate complications occurred at insertion. One balloon ruptured and had to be replaced. Insertion of the catheter with local anesthesia took less than five minutes. The total procedure, including preparation time, averaged 25 minutes.

Co-authors are Ellen B. Mendelson, M.D., Krystyna D. Kiel, M.D., and Judith A. Wolfman, M.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Radiological Society of North America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Radiological Society of North America. "Breast Cancer Treatment Procedure Gives Women More Options." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 November 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061129151535.htm>.
Radiological Society of North America. (2006, November 30). Breast Cancer Treatment Procedure Gives Women More Options. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061129151535.htm
Radiological Society of North America. "Breast Cancer Treatment Procedure Gives Women More Options." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061129151535.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

AFP (Sep. 17, 2014) A healthy British volunteer is to become the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus after US President Barack Obama called for action against the epidemic and warned it was "spiralling out of control." Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Researchers are puzzled as to why obesity rates remain relatively stable as average waistlines continue to expand. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins