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Adding Activity To Video Games Fights Obesity, Study Shows

Date:
January 10, 2007
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
If playing video games makes kids less active -- and contributes to obesity -- why not create more video games that require activity?

If playing video games makes kids less active -- and contributes to obesity -- why not create more video games that require activity? That's the question prompted by a Mayo Clinic research study published in the current issue of the medical journal Pediatrics.

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"We know if kids play video games that require movement, they burn more energy than they would while sitting and playing traditional screen games. That's pretty obvious even without our data," says Lorraine Lanningham-Foster, Ph.D., Mayo obesity researcher and study leader. "The point is that children -- very focused on screen games -- can be made healthier if activity is a required part of the game."

The study is the first to scientifically measure the energy spent playing video games. While the study's scope is small -- only 25 children -- it was conducted with great accuracy. Fifteen children were of normal weight for their height and frame; 10 were mildly obese. Both groups were tested while sitting and watching television, playing a traditional video game, playing two types of activity-required video games, and watching television while walking on a treadmill.

The results showed that sitting while watching television and playing traditional video games expended the same amount of energy. When participants played with the first activity-oriented video game, one that uses a camera to virtually "place" them in the game where they catch balls and other objects, their energy expenditure tripled. The result was the same for the lean and mildly obese children. Walking on a treadmill while watching TV also tripled expenditure for the lean group, but showed a nearly fivefold increase for the mildly obese group. While using a dance video game, both groups burned the most calories, but it was considerably more for the obese group -- just over six times more than sitting still.

Screen time (both TV and video games) now averages eight hours a day among children. The Mayo researchers suggest requiring activity in more video and computer games is one potential approach for reversing the obesity trend. Despite the small sample in this study, the researchers consider the findings robust and say that they warrant further studies in randomized trials.

Other study authors include Teresa Jensen, M.D.; Randal Foster; Aoife Redmond, M.B.B.Ch.; Brian Walker; Dieter Heinz, M.D.; and James Levine, M.D., Ph.D. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health and Mayo Clinic.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Adding Activity To Video Games Fights Obesity, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070104144703.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2007, January 10). Adding Activity To Video Games Fights Obesity, Study Shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070104144703.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Adding Activity To Video Games Fights Obesity, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070104144703.htm (accessed November 20, 2014).

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