Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hospital Investigates New Prophylactic HPV Vaccine

Date:
January 30, 2007
Source:
Temple University Health System
Summary:
Temple University Hospital's Center For Women's Health is participating in a national study to determine the safety and effectiveness of an investigational treatment for cervical dysplasia. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 500,000 women are diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia each year, with roughly 10,000 cases progressing to cervical cancer. The expected widespread availability of two preventive vaccines may lower the incidence of HPV infection and reduce the risk of cervical cancer.

Temple University Hospital's Center For Women's Health is participating in a national study to determine the safety and effectiveness of an investigational treatment for cervical dysplasia. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 500,000 women are diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia each year, with roughly 10,000 cases progressing to cervical cancer.

For numerous women afflicted with the common sexually transmitted disease known as human papillomavirus (HPV), the immune system can not prevent certain high-risk strains of the virus from causing cervical dysplasia, a common precursor to cervical cancer. "The expected widespread availability of two preventive vaccines may lower the incidence of HPV infection and reduce the risk of cervical cancer," said Enrigue Hernandez, The Abraham Roth Professor and Chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Temple University Hospital and School of Medicine. "However, for those women already infected with HPV, and those who will become infected, there are emerging non-surgical options in development."

HPV vaccines are expected to be a significant advance in women's healthcare, but they will not protect all women from cervical cancer. "Prophylactic vaccines will probably not help the more than 350,000 women in the U.S. already infected with HPV who have moderate to severe cervical dysplasia, a precancerous condition," explained Hernandez.

Amolimogene is an investigational immunotherapeutic from MGI PHARMA, Inc. that is currently being evaluated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical program in multiple centers in the U.S., including Philadelphia. "This product candidate is designed to enhance the body's immune response to cervical dysplasia, and is being developed to offer patients with cervical dysplasia and healthcare providers an option to surgical intervention," explained Hernandez. "Qualified participants must be 25 or younger, with an abnormal Pap test result in the past six months."

According to Hernandez, HPV vaccines have shown protection against certain high-risk strains that cause approximately 55 percent of high-grade cervical dysplasia and 70 percent of cervical cancer cases. "The vaccines do not eliminate the risk of developing cervical cancer," said Hernandez. " They do not provide protection to women who are already infected with HPV, nor have they been shown to cure existing disease or lesions."

Every year, more than 3 million women have an abnormal result on a routine Pap test. Of these women, about 300,000-500,000 receive a diagnosis of moderate to severe cervical dysplasia, caused by certain high-risk HPV strains. "The prophylactic vaccines, which are highly effective in preventing the initial HPV infection, have not demonstrated effectiveness after the infection has progressed to cervical dysplasia," Hernandez explained.

For women diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia, the most widely utilized treatment option is surgery. "The most common surgical procedure is LEEP (Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure), which removes the diseased part of the cervix," said Hernandez. "Although LEEP is effective, it may cause complications related to fertility and childbirth, such as cervical stenosis, pre-term delivery, low birthweight babies, and premature rupture of membranes."

Approximately 20 million people, mostly women, are currently infected with HPV, with 6.2 million new infections occurring annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a three-year study of college-aged women, 60 percent of subjects were infected with HPV. While the virus clears itself from the body in most women within two years, about a dozen high-risk strains can lead to more serious problems and are the main culprit for cervical cancer.

Study participants will receive all study related care at no charge. Compensation for time and travel may also be provided. Women should continue their routine Ob/Gyn visits for Pap smears to aid in the detection of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer.

For more information about the amolimogene clinical program, contact Temple University Hospital's Center for Women's Health, at 215-707-3015, or 215-707-9087.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Temple University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Temple University Health System. "Hospital Investigates New Prophylactic HPV Vaccine." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 January 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070130104715.htm>.
Temple University Health System. (2007, January 30). Hospital Investigates New Prophylactic HPV Vaccine. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070130104715.htm
Temple University Health System. "Hospital Investigates New Prophylactic HPV Vaccine." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070130104715.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Herman Goldman has worked at the same lighting store for almost 75 years. Find out his secrets to a happy, productive life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Nancy Writebol, an American missionary who contracted Ebola, is apparently getting better, according to her husband. The outbreak, however, is not. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins