Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Erectile Dysfunction Influenced By Race And Ethnicity

Date:
February 1, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
According to a new study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent across white, black and Hispanic populations in the United States. For the first time in an adequately-sized, nationally representative probability sample, the effect of health and lifestyle variables on the odds of having ED were determined in order to estimate prevalence by race and ethnicity.

According to a new study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine, erectile dysfunction (ED) is highly prevalent across white, black and Hispanic populations in the United States. For the first time in an adequately-sized, nationally representative probability sample, the effect of health and lifestyle variables on the odds of having ED were determined in order to estimate prevalence by race and ethnicity.

Related Articles


White men age 70 years and older, as well as those suffering from diabetes, were shown to be at greater risk for developing ED. Severe lower urinary tract symptoms were shown to be ED related in black men. Hispanic men over the age of 60, as well as those suffering from moderate lower urinary tract symptoms, hypertension and/or depression were increasingly likely to suffer from ED. Odds decreased in black men who exercised or had good partner relationships, and in Hispanic men with a high school or higher education.

“Consistent with numerous other studies, age has again been shown to be a very important risk factor for ED,” says Ed Laumann, lead author of the study. “We have also learned from this study that different lifestyle and health conditions appear to play significantly different roles in different racial/ethnic groups. Further research is needed to clarify the mechanisms that account for these differences.”

“The specific risk factors for sexual dysfunction in minority men have not been previously explored,” according to Ray Rosen, co-author of the study. “This study shows the importance of psychosocial influences in ED, particularly the effects of depression and a poor partner relationship in minority men. Given the prevalence of physical risk factors (diabetes, hypertension) also in minority men, these results should alert clinicians to the particular relevance of sexual function in minority men to overall health and well-being.”

“This is important new research in sexual medicine,” observed Irwin Goldstein, Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Sexual Medicine. "The United States is made up of numerous racial and ethnic populations. Previous epidemiologic studies have examined the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in populations largely of Caucasian men. Translation of the sexual medicine findings of one population group to another can only really be done by directly studying the specific ethnic/racial group.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Erectile Dysfunction Influenced By Race And Ethnicity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070131155311.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, February 1). Erectile Dysfunction Influenced By Race And Ethnicity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070131155311.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Erectile Dysfunction Influenced By Race And Ethnicity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/01/070131155311.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

AP (Jan. 30, 2015) The NFL announced this week that the number of game concussions dropped by a quarter over last season. Still, the dangers of the sport still weigh on players, and parents&apos; minds. (Jan. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Shows Newborn Chicks Count From Left to Right Just Like Humans

Study Shows Newborn Chicks Count From Left to Right Just Like Humans

Buzz60 (Jan. 30, 2015) Researchers for the first time identified human&apos;s innate preference for associating low and high numbers with the left and right respectively in another species. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Best Mood Elevating, Feel Good Shakes & Smoothies

Best Mood Elevating, Feel Good Shakes & Smoothies

Buzz60 (Jan. 30, 2015) You can elevate your mood by having a meal in a glass. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) offers the best &apos;feel good&apos; smoothies and shakes chock full of depression-relieving ingredients...including apples, berries, lemons, cucumbers, papaya, kiwi, spinach, kale, whey protein, matcha, ginger, turmeric and cinnamon. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Poll Says Firstborn Is Responsible, Youngest Is Funnier

Poll Says Firstborn Is Responsible, Youngest Is Funnier

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) According to a poll out of the U.K., eldest siblings feel more responsible and successful than their younger siblings. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins