Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Biomarker Test Could Predict Outcome For Bladder Cancer Patients

Date:
February 17, 2007
Source:
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Summary:
A set of molecular biomarkers might better predict the recurrence of bladder cancer than conventional prognostic features such as the stage or grade of the malignancy at the time it is discovered, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.

Drs. Yair Lotan (left) and Jose Karam have helped identify a set of molecular biomarkers that could better predict the recurrence of bladder cancer than conventional prognostic features such as the stage or grade of the malignancy.
Credit: Image courtesy of UT Southwestern Medical Center

A set of molecular biomarkers might better predict the recurrence of bladder cancer than conventional prognostic features such as the stage or grade of the malignancy at the time it is discovered, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.

Once a patient undergoes surgery for the removal of their bladder and lymph nodes -- the standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer -- researchers say a routine tissue analysis could easily test for the presence of mutated proteins, or biomarkers, that they found to help ascertain the chances that the cancer will return.

The findings, which researchers say could one day alter the postoperative treatment offered to patients who test positive for the mutated biomarkers, are available online and in an upcoming issue of The Lancet Oncology.

"Our goal is to identify patients who have a higher chance of cancer recurrence," said Dr. Jose Karam, the study's lead author and a medical resident at UT Southwestern. "If we can identify key biomarker alterations in these patients, we might be able to predict who will benefit from treatments such as chemotherapy."

In the study, UT Southwestern scientists investigated the association of the proteins Bcl-2, caspase-3, P53 and survivin with the recurrence of cancer after surgery. The proteins are known to regulate apoptosis, or programmed cell death.

Apoptosis is a way for the body to safely dispose of dead cells, and it plays a role in preventing cancer. If cells don't die when they are supposed to, they can continue dividing and change into a tumor.

"We are trying to identify tumors that are more aggressive and more likely to spread," said Dr. Yair Lotan, assistant professor of urology at UT Southwestern and an author of the study. "Even after we've removed a diseased bladder and lymph nodes from a patient, more than 20 percent of patients have disease elsewhere in their body."

Researchers collected archival tissue from 226 patients who underwent surgery for bladder cancer -- the fourth most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women -- between January 1987 and December 2002. They tested the tissue for the protein biomarkers and found that patients who showed mutations in all four biomarkers had a significantly increased rate of mortality from cancer after surgery. Patients who showed no mutations in the four biomarkers had a 90 percent chance of survival at five years compared to less than 20 percent if they had four mutated markers.

Dr. Shahrokh Shariat, the study's senior author and a urology resident at UT Southwestern, said the findings suggest that mutations in the biomarkers indicate a malfunction in programmed cell death, leading to increased chances of cancer recurrence and mortality.

Dr. Karam noted that while the findings are still preliminary and need to be scientifically validated before being applied in the clinic, the results could change the treatment patients receive.

"Patients who have alterations on all four biomarkers might benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy even if the cancer appears to be confined to their bladder.

Otherwise, their chances for survival are likely to be poor," said Dr. Karam. "Likewise, those who show none of the biomarkers might not need unnecessary chemotherapy."

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study were Dr. Arthur Sagalowsky, professor of urology and surgery; Dr. Claus G. Roehrborn, chairman of urology; Dr. Shahrokh F. Shariat, medical resident; and Dr. Raheela Ashfaq, professor of pathology. Researchers from the University of Montreal also participated.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Austrian Programme for Advanced Research and Technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by UT Southwestern Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

UT Southwestern Medical Center. "New Biomarker Test Could Predict Outcome For Bladder Cancer Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070201144530.htm>.
UT Southwestern Medical Center. (2007, February 17). New Biomarker Test Could Predict Outcome For Bladder Cancer Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070201144530.htm
UT Southwestern Medical Center. "New Biomarker Test Could Predict Outcome For Bladder Cancer Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070201144530.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins