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New Advance In Lung Cancer Treatment

Date:
April 25, 2007
Source:
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Summary:
Researchers have developed methods for treating lung cancer cells that have become resistant to new anti-cancer agents, such as Tarceva (erlotinib). Using a new second-generation of Tarceva-like medications, researchers can overcome the drug resistance.
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FULL STORY

Researchers at the Ireland Cancer Center of University Hospitals Case Medical Center have developed methods for treating lung cancer cells that have become resistant to new anti-cancer agents.

Led by Balazs Halmos, MD, hematologist/oncologist with the Ireland Cancer Center, the research team followed up on their previous study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, which found that lung cancer cells can become resistant to novel targeted agents, such as Tarceva (erlotinib), a medication in widespread use for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Tarceva is among a new generation of cancer therapies that disrupt the molecular target responsible for stimulating tumor growth. The drug targets the receptor for the epidermal growth factor protein (EGFR) to halt the spread of cancer cells. Clinical applications of the new drug initially yielded good results with approximately 10 percent of patients experiencing complete remission of their disease.

However, in spite of the therapy's initial success, patients inevitably suffered a relapse of their disease. Dr. Halmos' studies confirmed the existence of a mutation, and insertion of this mutation into test cells rendered them resistant to Tarceva. These cells became resistant by undergoing a miniscule molecular change in the EGFR protein that the medication targets.

Further analysis revealed that the newly identified mutation was altering the protein's drug-binding pocket and thereby changing the "keyhole" so that the "key" -- Tarceva -- no longer fit. The researchers found that new second-generation Tarceva-like medications can overcome this change and such drugs are now in development, including in clinical trials at the Ireland Cancer Center.

In this latest study, that received an award at the annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) meeting where it was presented earlier this month, Dr. Halmos and his team were able to predict molecular changes the tumors might take next to become resistant to this new class of agents. "We tried to outsmart tumors by anticipating their next moves," says Dr. Halmos, a lung cancer specialist and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "This research revealed a number of new changes that EGFR can undergo that leads to resistance and also found ways to conquer this next generation of mutants."

The research team developed compounds to overcome the resistance with innovative combinations of medications. "Using these combinations early on can prevent resistance," explains Dr. Halmos. "Through this research, we are redefining our tools and anticipating ways to fight lung cancer."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Hospitals of Cleveland. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Hospitals of Cleveland. "New Advance In Lung Cancer Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423155106.htm>.
University Hospitals of Cleveland. (2007, April 25). New Advance In Lung Cancer Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 22, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423155106.htm
University Hospitals of Cleveland. "New Advance In Lung Cancer Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423155106.htm (accessed May 22, 2015).

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