Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Long-term Anti-clotting Therapy Reduces Risk Of Heart Attack For Some Patients, Study Suggests

Date:
May 19, 2007
Source:
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions
Summary:
A study showing that diabetic patients who are treated with long-term anti-clotting therapy are less likely to have a heart attack or die more than a year after stenting has been named among the best research papers presented at the 30th annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.

A study showing that diabetic patients who are treated with long-term anti-clotting therapy are less likely to have a heart attack or die more than a year after stenting has been named among the best research papers presented at the 30th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), May 9--12, 2007.

The study found that regardless of whether clogged coronary arteries were propped open with a drug-eluting or bare metal stent, diabetic patients were more likely to enjoy continued good health if treatment with the anti-clotting drug clopidogrel was continued for more than 6 months.

The new study suggests that physicians may need to tailor anti-clotting therapy to the special needs of patients with diabetes, a condition that not only causes high blood sugar levels but can damage and inflame arteries throughout the body.

"Diabetics are among the highest-risk groups undergoing coronary interventions," said Somjot S Brar, M.D., a cardiologist at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Los Angeles. "It is very common for these patients to have diffuse coronary artery disease."

In patients who do not have diabetes, cardiologists typically prescribe a combination of aspirin and clopidogrel for about 1 month after placement of a bare metal stent, to prevent blood clotting, or thrombosis, in the stent during healing. With drug-eluting stents, it is now common to extend the length of treatment with anti-clotting medication to a full year, based on evidence that these devices are more prone to very late thrombosis than was once believed. The ideal length of clopidogrel therapy remains unknown, however, particularly in patients with diabetes.

In the study presented during the SCAI Annual Scientific Sessions, Dr. Brar and his colleagues identified 671 diabetic patients who had a stenting procedure and remained healthy during the first 6 months of follow-up. Patients were then divided into 4 groups, depending on whether they had been treated with a bare metal or drug-eluting stent, and whether they were continuing to take clopidogrel for longer than 6 months.

One year later, diabetic patients who were treated with a drug-eluting stent were less likely to have suffered a heart attack or died if they continued taking clopidogrel than if they discontinued the medication (2.2 percent versus 5.5 percent, respectively; p=0.07). More surprising was the finding that even with bare metal stents, long-term clopidogrel therapy significantly reduced the risk of death or heart attack (3.5 percent versus 12.2 percent, p=0.01). Among patients who discontinued clopidogrel after 6 months, the difference in the combined rate of death or heart attack for drug-eluting and bare metal stents was not statistically significant.

Dr. Brar speculated that in diabetic patients, long-term clopidogrel therapy may be helpful regardless of the type of stent because it prevents blood clots from forming on inflamed plaques throughout the diseased coronary arteries, not just on the stent itself.

As for when it is safe to stop clopidogrel in diabetic patients, the study recorded the lowest rate of death or heart attack among those who continued therapy for up to 1 year. After that, the anti-clotting medication did not further reduce risk.

"Regardless of the type of stent, clopidogrel should be continued for more than 6 months--and perhaps for as long as 1 year--in diabetic patients, whenever possible," Dr. Brar said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. "Long-term Anti-clotting Therapy Reduces Risk Of Heart Attack For Some Patients, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070517094208.htm>.
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. (2007, May 19). Long-term Anti-clotting Therapy Reduces Risk Of Heart Attack For Some Patients, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070517094208.htm
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. "Long-term Anti-clotting Therapy Reduces Risk Of Heart Attack For Some Patients, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070517094208.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

AFP (July 28, 2014) The worst-ever outbreak of the deadly Ebola epidemic grips west Africa, killing hundreds. Duration: 00:48 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins