Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Among Youth In US, Whites Have Highest Incidence Of Diabetes

Date:
June 26, 2007
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Non-Hispanic white youth have the highest rate of diabetes of all racial/ethnic groups for children in the US, with type 1 being the predominant kind of diabetes among youth, according to a study in the June 27 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on chronic diseases of children.

Non-Hispanic white youth have the highest rate of diabetes of all racial/ethnic groups for children in the U.S., with type 1 being the predominant kind of diabetes among youth, according to a study in the June 27 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on chronic diseases of children.

Dana Dabelea, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, presented the findings of the study at a JAMA media briefing in New York.

Estimates of the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) show an increase in incidence worldwide during the past two decades, according to background information in the article. Type 2 DM has traditionally been viewed as a disorder of adults, most likely persons who are middle-age or elderly. But as the prevalence of obesity has increased in recent decades, some studies have reported an increasing proportion of youth with type 2 DM, especially among racial/ethnic minority populations. However, data are limited regarding the types and incidence of DM among U.S. youth of different racial/ethnic backgrounds.

Dr. Dabelea and colleagues with the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study Group identified the cases of DM among individuals younger than 20 years in the U.S. to estimate the population incidence of type 1 and 2 DM overall and by age and race/ethnicity. The study included 2,435 multi-ethnic youth with newly diagnosed DM in 2002 and 2003, from 10 locations in the U.S.

Overall, the incidence rate (per 100,000 person-years [the number of individuals in the study times the number of years of follow-up per person]) of DM was 24.3. The incidence rate was highest among 10- to 14-year-old youth (33.9), and slightly higher in females vs. males. Overall, the highest incidence rates of DM were observed among non-Hispanic white (26.1), African American (25.4), and American Indian youth (25.0), with lower rates among Hispanic and Asian-Pacific Islander youth.

For children age 0 to 4 years and 5 to 9 years, most DM was type 1, regardless of race/ethnicity. The incidence of type 1 DM was highest among non-Hispanic white children, and lowest among American Indian and Asian-Pacific Islander children. Similarly, for older youth (10-14 years and 15-19 years), the incidence of type 1 DM was highest among non-Hispanic white children, followed by African American and Hispanic youth.

"... taken together [with other studies], these data suggest that the incidence of type 1 DM may be increasing in the United States, consistent with worldwide trends," the authors write. "We estimate that the annual number of newly diagnosed youth with type 1 DM in the United States is approximately 15,000."

Overall, type 2 DM was relatively infrequent, but the highest rates were documented among 15- to 19-year-old minority groups, including American Indian youth, followed by African American, Asian-Pacific Islander, and Hispanic youth. "Although the evidence of the presence of type 2 DM in youth is still developing, it is consistent with the increasing prevalence of type 2 DM in adults, and the increasing prevalence of obesity in both adults and children."

"The SEARCH study provides unique population-based data on the incidence of DM among youth of various racial/ethnic backgrounds, according to DM type. Continuing this surveillance effort will document temporal trends in the incidence of DM among various racial/ethnic groups and accurately assess the future health care burden of DM and its complications in the U.S. pediatric and young adult population," the researchers conclude.

Reference: JAMA. 2007;297:2716-2724.

Editorial: Incidence of Diabetes in Children and Youth--Tracking a Moving Target

In an accompanying editorial, Rebecca B. Lipton, Ph.D., M.P.H., B.S.N., of the University of Chicago, comments on the findings of Dabelea and colleagues.

"The SEARCH project adds some detail to the understanding of the changing nature of diabetes risk in the United States. The authors have ascertained cases in a range of settings, under the stringent privacy regulations that have constrained much population-based research in the United States recently. In particular, their group is well positioned to examine geographic differences in diabetes risk among the diverse locations represented in the SEARCH study."

"As this and other research goes forward, it may be possible to develop a better understanding of the interplay of autoimmunity with youth-onset diabetes. There is an urgent need to go beyond studies such as this one by implementing a coordinated approach to childhood diabetes surveillance (i.e., mandated case-reporting). Only then can society respond effectively to the serious and increasing challenge of diabetes in youth."

Reference: JAMA. 2007;297:2760-2761.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Among Youth In US, Whites Have Highest Incidence Of Diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070626115411.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2007, June 26). Among Youth In US, Whites Have Highest Incidence Of Diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070626115411.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Among Youth In US, Whites Have Highest Incidence Of Diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070626115411.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins