Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

One Step Closer To Transplanting Stem Cells In The Brain

Date:
August 20, 2007
Source:
Göteborg University
Summary:
Stem cells transplanted into the brains of mice generate more numerous and more mature nerve cells if the brain cells called astrocytes are not activated. This discovery is an important step forward for stem cell research. Many see the transplantation of stem cells and activation of the body's own stem cells as a promising future treatment for several neurological disorders.

Stem cells transplanted into the brains of mice generate more numerous and more mature nerve cells if the brain cells called astrocytes are not activated. This discovery at the Sahlgrenska Academy is an important step forward for stem cell research.

The study was performed by a research team at the Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation at the Sahlgrenska Academy. The findings are being published in the journal Stem Cells.

Many see the transplantation of stem cells and activation of the body's own stem cells as a promising future treatment for several neurological disorders.

"Intensive research is under way around the world to find ways to get stem cells to develop into the right kind of cells, to migrate through brain tissue to the right place and then survive. Even though much work remains to be done before patients benefit from this knowledge, our findings are an important step in that direction," says Milos Pekny, professor at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University in Sweden.

Astrocytes are a type of cells in the central nervous system that control many neurological functions, including the capacity of the brain to repair itself. The research team has previously shown that reduced activation of astrocytes leads to prolonged healing of the damage, but that ultimately the regeneration of the nerve fibers and synapses of nerve cells is enhanced. Decreased activation of astrocytes also yields better results when cells are transplanted into the retina.

"Astrocytes are also activated when stem cells are transplanted into the brain, and we show that this negatively affects the development of the stem cells," says Milos Pekny.

The scientists used genetically modified mice whose astrocytes are unable to produce two proteins called GFAP and vimentin. Such astrocytes have a limited capacity to become activated. When neural stem cells are cultured with these modified astrocytes, the generation of nerve cells was increased by 65 percent. At the same time, the formation of new astrocytes rose by 124 percent.

In the study, stem cells were transplanted into the mouse hippocampus, an area where new nerve cells are generated also in adults. When mice with limited astrocyte activation were used as recipients, there was an increase in the number of nerve cells and astrocytes generated from the transplanted stem cells. The newly generated nerve cells were also more mature than those in normal mice.

"These studies were carried out in collaboration with Professor Peter Eriksson, a great friend, a fantastic colleague, and a pioneer in human neural stem cell research, whom we lost very suddenly just a few days ago," says Milos Pekny.

Reference: Journal: Stem Cells, Title of article: Increased Neurogenesis and Astrogenesis from Neural Progenitor Cells Grafted in the Hippocampus of GFAP-/-Vimentin-/- Mice, Authors: Åsa Widestrand, Jonas Faijerson, Ulrika Wilhelmsson, Peter L. P. Smith, Lizhen Li, Carina Sihlbom, Peter S. Eriksson, Milos Pekny


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Göteborg University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Göteborg University. "One Step Closer To Transplanting Stem Cells In The Brain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070818094000.htm>.
Göteborg University. (2007, August 20). One Step Closer To Transplanting Stem Cells In The Brain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070818094000.htm
Göteborg University. "One Step Closer To Transplanting Stem Cells In The Brain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070818094000.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) — Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

AFP (Sep. 17, 2014) — A healthy British volunteer is to become the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus after US President Barack Obama called for action against the epidemic and warned it was "spiralling out of control." Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) — Researchers are puzzled as to why obesity rates remain relatively stable as average waistlines continue to expand. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) — President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins