Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Celecoxib Helps Prevent Restenosis And Appears Safe

Date:
August 22, 2007
Source:
The Lancet
Summary:
Adjunctive use of the COX-2 inhibitor celcoxib after stent implantation in patients with coronary artery disease appears safe and can reduce the need for revascularisation of the target lesion, conclude authors of a new article. But an accompanying comment warns that clinical trials suggest long-term use of celecoxib can expose patients to an additional risk of heart attack.

Adjunctive use of the COX-2* inhibitor celcoxib after stent implantation in patients with coronary artery disease is safe and can reduce the need for revascularisation of the target lesion, conclude authors of an article published in the recent cardiology special issue of The Lancet.

But an accompanying comment warns that clinical trials suggest long-term use of celecoxib can expose patients to an additional risk of heart attack.

Dr Hyo-Soo Kim, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea and colleagues have published the results of the COREA-TAXUS trial, which aimed to test whether the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib could prevent the formation of smooth muscle tissue (neointima) within stents, which can lead to narrowing and eventually re-blockage of the lumen of the stent (restenosis).

They studied 274 patients, all of whom were given aspirin (100mg) daily and clopidogrel (75mg daily). Of these, 136 were randomly assigned to receive celecoxib (400mg before the stent implantation, and then 200mg twice daily for 6 months after the procedure). The in-stent lumen diameter of all patients was measured using a coronary angiography six months after stent implantation.

The researchers found that the average reduction on in-stent luminal diameter was 0.49mm in the celecoxib group and 0.75mm in the control group, meaning that celecoxib reduced the luminal reduction by 35%. There was also a decreased need for target-lesion revascularisation in the celecoxib group.

The authors say: “These data suggest that the adjunctive use of celecoxib for 6 months after stent implantation in patients with coronary artery is safe.” They add that unlike with another COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib, celecoxib does not increase the risk of cardiovascular events. They say: “Administration of celecoxib for 6 months does not seem to increase the risk of adverse cardiac events in the intermediate term when used with dual anti-platelet therapy. We will be interested to see the 2-5 year follow-up results of this cohort.”

In the accompanying comment, Drs Francesco Pelliccia and Vincenzo Pasceri, Interventional Cardiology Unit, Ospedale San Filippo Neri, Rome, Italy say that the safety of celecoxib needs to be confirmed by studies to assess risk of heart attack and cardiac death, and that gastrointestinal tolerability of celecoxib in combination with aspirin and clopidogrel could also be a drawback.

However the comment authors conclude: “The study by Koo and colleagues underscores that systemic therapy might still have a role in prevention of restenosis, even in the era of drug-eluting stents.”

*A COX-2 selective inhibitor is a form of Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that directly targets COX-2, an enzyme responsible for inflammation and pain.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Lancet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Lancet. "Celecoxib Helps Prevent Restenosis And Appears Safe." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070818102805.htm>.
The Lancet. (2007, August 22). Celecoxib Helps Prevent Restenosis And Appears Safe. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070818102805.htm
The Lancet. "Celecoxib Helps Prevent Restenosis And Appears Safe." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070818102805.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) A look inside Monrovia's Island Hospital, a key treatment centre in the fight against Ebola in Liberia's capital city. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) The Ebola outbreak is putting stress on first responders in Liberia. Ambulance drivers say they are struggling with chronic shortages of safety equipment and patients who don't want to go to the hospital. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) After the announcement that the first U.S. patient had been diagnosed with Ebola, doctors were quick to say a U.S. outbreak is highly unlikely. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) Medical officials from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital confirm they are treating a patient with the Ebola virus, the first case found in the US. (Sept. 30 Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins