Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel 3-D Cell Culture Model Shows Selective Tumor Uptake Of Nanoparticles

Date:
August 28, 2007
Source:
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Summary:
A novel cell culture model consisting of an aggregate of brain tumor cells growing on normal thin slices of brain tissue has been developed to investigate tumor properties and therapy. The tumor cells showed a similar invasion pattern to that seen when growing in patients. When nanoparticles made from a new type of polymer were added to the co-culture, the nanoparticles were taken up more by the tumor cells than the normal brain cells.

Fluorescence picture showing uptake of nanoparticles labelled with red fluorescence taken up principally by tumor cells labelled with green microparticles. Few nanoparticles can be seen on the brain slice (blue) underneath.
Credit: Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

A nanoparticle drug delivery system designed for brain tumor therapy has shown promising tumor cell selectivity in a novel cell culture model devised by University of Nottingham scientists. The project, conducted jointly in the Schools of Pharmacy, Biomedical Sciences and Human Development, will be featured in the September issue of the Experimental Biology and Medicine.

Related Articles


Therapy for brain cancers is particularly difficult for a number of reasons, including getting sufficient drug to the tumor and selectivity of drug action. "We are working on a number of new therapeutic approaches using nanoparticle drug delivery systems explained Dr Martin Garnett, Associate Professor of drug delivery at the School of Pharmacy, however, understanding and developing these systems requires suitable models for their evaluation."

The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from a novel biodegradable polymer poly(glycerol adipate). The polymer has been further modified to enhance incorporation of drugs and make the nanoparticles more effective.

"The interaction of tumor cells with brain cells varies between different tumors and different locations within the brain explained Dr Terence Parker, Associate Professor in the School of Biomedical Sciences. Using 3-dimensional culture models is therefore important in ensuring that the behavior of cells in culture is similar to that seen in real life."

The work was mainly carried out by graduate student Weina Meng who formulated the fluorescently labeled nanoparticles and studied them in a variety of tumor and brain cell cultures. Her early studies showed faster uptake of nanoparticles into tumor cell cultures than normal brain cell cultures grown separately. This selectivity was only seen in 3-dimensional cultures and was the driving force to develop a more complex and representative model.

Tumor cell aggregates have been used as cell culture models of cancer cells for many years. Similarly thin brain slices from newborn rats can be cultured for weeks and are an important tool in brain biology. In the cell co-culture model now reported, these two techniques have been brought together for the first time. Brain tumor cell aggregates were labeled with fluorescent iron microparticles and grown on normal newborn rat-brain tissue slices.

The double cell labeling technique allowed investigation of tumor cell invasion into brain tissue by either fluorescence or electron microscopy from the same samples. Using these techniques the tumor aggregates were found to invade the brain slices in a similar manner to tumors in the body. Having developed the model then the tumor selective uptake of nanoparticles was demonstrated in the co-culture.

The collaboration on this project has been nurtured by Professor David Walker of the School of Human Development who co-founded the Children's Brain Tumor Research Group at Nottingham. "Understanding the biology of tumors is important if we are to develop effective new treatments said Professor Walker. This work demonstrates how close co-operation between disciplines can help to push forward ideas which could lead to new clinical therapies."

Dr. Steven R. Goodman, Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Biology and Medicine, agrees with Professor Walker. Dr. Goodman stated "The convergence of cancer cell biology and nanoscience, exemplified by this study, holds great promise for the future of brain tumor therapy." Experimental Biology and Medicine is a journal dedicated to the publication of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research in the biomedical sciences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. "Novel 3-D Cell Culture Model Shows Selective Tumor Uptake Of Nanoparticles." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070823083706.htm>.
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. (2007, August 28). Novel 3-D Cell Culture Model Shows Selective Tumor Uptake Of Nanoparticles. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070823083706.htm
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. "Novel 3-D Cell Culture Model Shows Selective Tumor Uptake Of Nanoparticles." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070823083706.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins