Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hormone-driven Effects On Eating, Stress Mediated By Same Brain Region

Date:
September 29, 2007
Source:
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Summary:
A hormone system linked to reducing food consumption appears to do so by increasing stress-related behaviors, according to a new study. "With the increasing focus on obesity, people are interested in finding targets that can be used to develop drugs that will reduce appetite and food intake without a lot of side effects," according to one of the scientists.

A hormone system linked to reducing food consumption appears to do so by increasing stress-related behaviors, according to a new study.

Mediated by a hormone receptor protein known as the corticotropin-releasing factor type 2 (CRF2) receptor, the system has attracted recent interest for its role in regulating food intake, say Vaishali Bakshi and Ned Kalin, professors in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.

"With the increasing focus on obesity, people are interested in finding targets that can be used to develop drugs that will reduce appetite and food intake without a lot of side effects," Bakshi says.

Previous studies have shown that activation of this receptor decreases the amount of food voluntarily eaten by hungry rats, an effect called induced anorexia. This finding led some researchers to suggest that the CRF2 receptor system might be a promising target for therapies to combat obesity.

However, the new study, appearing Sept. 26 in the Journal of Neuroscience, shows that CRF2 receptors in a single brain region, the lateral septum, mediate both feeding and behaviors associated with stress, suggesting this protein may not be an ideal therapeutic target.

By selectively stimulating the CRF2 receptors in the lateral septum, Bakshi and her colleagues found that the treated rats ate less overall - roughly half as much as untreated rats - because they spent less time at it.

"The reason that the rats were eating less after having CRF2 receptors stimulated in the lateral septum was because instead of eating they were spending most of their time exhibiting stress-like behaviors," such as excessive grooming, which Bakshi says has been proposed to represent a type of coping behavior.

In addition, the eating suppression may be secondary to the apparent stress-inducing effects of the receptor. "We found anxiety-like responses at smaller doses than those required to get the reduction in feeding," Bakshi says. "In terms of the chicken and the egg, it suggests that maybe the stress comes first and that the reduction in feeding comes second."

The role of CRF2 receptors in stress responses does not come as a complete surprise, Bakshi says, because the related protein CRF1 receptor exerts similar influences in a different brain region and has been studied for its involvement in anxiety disorders and clinical depression.

However, the finding does suggest that the CRF2 receptor pathway is not likely to be a good choice for the hoped-for obesity treatment.

"This is a cautionary tale," says Bakshi. "We're refuting a global statement that CRF2 stimulation reduces ingestive behavior without eliciting stress-like effects."

The work was carried out in the lab of Ned Kalin and other authors on the study include Sarah Newman, Stephanie Smith-Roe, and Kimberly Jochman. The work was supported by grants from the UW HealthEmotions Research Institute, Meriter Hospital, and the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Wisconsin-Madison. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Wisconsin-Madison. "Hormone-driven Effects On Eating, Stress Mediated By Same Brain Region." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070926085136.htm>.
University of Wisconsin-Madison. (2007, September 29). Hormone-driven Effects On Eating, Stress Mediated By Same Brain Region. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070926085136.htm
University of Wisconsin-Madison. "Hormone-driven Effects On Eating, Stress Mediated By Same Brain Region." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070926085136.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) A study published in the journal "Neurology" interviewed more than 19,000 people and found 15 percent suffer from being "sleep drunk." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) A new study found fewer deaths from prescription drug overdoses in states that have legalized medical marijuana. But experts disagree on the results. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Heart Group: E-Cigarettes May Help Smokers Quit

Heart Group: E-Cigarettes May Help Smokers Quit

AP (Aug. 25, 2014) The American Heart Association's first policy statement on electronic cigarettes backs them as a last resort to help smokers quit and calls for more regulation to keep them away from youth. (Aug. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Push For Later Start Times As School Year Kicks Off

Doctors Push For Later Start Times As School Year Kicks Off

Newsy (Aug. 25, 2014) The American Academy of Pediatrics is the latest group pushing for middle schools and high schools to start later, for the sake of their kids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins