Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

High Blood Pressure May Be Due To Excess Weight In Half Of Overweight Adults

Date:
October 3, 2007
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
As many as 50 percent of overweight men and women with high blood pressure may have hypertension as a result of being overweight, researchers reported. About one in three American adults has high blood pressure, which is defined as a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. High blood pressure increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, the number 1 and number 3 causes of death in the United States.

As many as 50 percent of overweight men and women with high blood pressure may have hypertension as a result of being overweight, researchers reported today at the American Heart Association's 61st Annual Fall Conference of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research.

Researchers in Italy found that about 50 percent of overweight, hypertensive adults, ranging in age from 29 to 65 years, achieved normal body weight and blood pressure after six months of treatment with a reduced-calorie diet.

"This is important because it means that in these patients with elevated blood pressure who were overweight, the blood pressure was not a form of essential hypertension but was hypertension secondary to body weight," said Roberto Fogari, M.D., lead investigator of the study and professor of medicine at the University of Pavia, Italy.

"These findings apply to western societies in general, but only to overweight patients, not to obese patients, with high blood pressure," Fogari said.

About one in three American adults has high blood pressure, which is defined as a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. High blood pressure increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, the number 1 and number 3 causes of death in the United States.

The study analyzed 210 overweight men and women whose systolic blood pressure was more than 140 mmHg, but less than 159 mm Hg, and whose diastolic blood pressure was more than 90 mm Hg, but less than 99 mm Hg. The study patients, who had never been treated for high blood pressure, were overweight with a body mass index (BMI) 25 to 29.9 kg/m2. An individualized reduced-calorie diet was designed for each patient and reflected their specific food preferences.

"The diet's main aim was to reduce calories to reduce the weight of each patient," Fogari said. About 50 percent of the patients also were treated with orlistat, a medication used with a low-calorie diet to help lose weight and maintain weight after losing pounds.

Orlistat is in a class of drugs called lipase inhibitors. It works in the intestines, where it blocks some of the fat eaten from being absorbed and digested. This undigested fat is then removed in bowel movements. Orlistat is often used with a low-calorie diet to achieve weight loss and maintain weight after weight loss in overweight patients who also may have high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol or heart disease.

"We gave orlistat only when diet alone was not able to achieve the appropriate reduction in body weight," Fogari said.

The dosages of orlistat varied from 120 milligrams (mg) to 360 mg daily and were individualized.

The aim of the study was to significantly reduce body weight by diet alone or diet plus orlistat and to evaluate the role that body weight loss had on blood pressure values.

After six months of dietary treatment, 49 percent of women and 53 percent of men achieved body weight reduction and normalization -- more than 5 percent weight loss, researchers said.

The study also found a mean reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure of about 5 percent.

Fogari emphasized the importance of initiating dietary advice and treatment in overweight patients with high blood pressure before beginning drug treatment.

"The first step is to help the overweight patient lose weight," he said. "Only after six months of trying to reduce the patient's weight can a decision be made about drug treatment." In the ongoing study, patients were evaluated at baseline, and after six and 12 months of treatment.

Co-authors are Paola Preti, M.D.; Pierangelo Lazzari, M.D.; Annalisa Zoppi, M.D.; Elena Fogari, M.D.; Maurizio Destro, M.D.; Andrea Rinaldi, M.D. and Amedeo Mugellini, M.D.

The Hypertension Center of the University of Pavia, Italy, funded the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "High Blood Pressure May Be Due To Excess Weight In Half Of Overweight Adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070928180348.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2007, October 3). High Blood Pressure May Be Due To Excess Weight In Half Of Overweight Adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070928180348.htm
American Heart Association. "High Blood Pressure May Be Due To Excess Weight In Half Of Overweight Adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070928180348.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

AFP (Sep. 17, 2014) A healthy British volunteer is to become the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus after US President Barack Obama called for action against the epidemic and warned it was "spiralling out of control." Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Researchers are puzzled as to why obesity rates remain relatively stable as average waistlines continue to expand. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins