Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Combined TMS Shows Potential In Tinnitus Treatment

Date:
September 30, 2007
Source:
American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Summary:
It is estimated that more than 50 million Americans suffer from tinnitus, a condition where the patient experiences ringing or other head noises that are not produced by an external source. This disorder can occur in one or both ears, range in pitch from a low roar to a high squeal, and may be continuous or sporadic. This often debilitating condition has been linked to ear injuries, circulatory system problems, noise-induced hearing loss, wax build-up in the ear canal, medications harmful to the ear, ear or sinus infections, misaligned jaw joints, head and neck trauma, Ménière's disease, and an abnormal growth of bone of the middle ear.

It is estimated that more than 50 million Americans suffer from tinnitus, a condition where the patient experiences ringing or other head noises that are not produced by an external source. This disorder can occur in one or both ears, range in pitch from a low roar to a high squeal, and may be continuous or sporadic.

This often debilitating condition has been linked to ear injuries, circulatory system problems, noise-induced hearing loss, wax build-up in the ear canal, medications harmful to the ear, ear or sinus infections, misaligned jaw joints, head and neck trauma, Ménière’s disease, and an abnormal growth of bone of the middle ear.

A new study presented at the 2007 AAO-HNSF Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO shows promise for a tinnitus treatment using combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive method to excite neurons in the brain. The study included 32 patients who received either low-frequency temporal TMS or a combination of high-frequency prefrontal and low-frequency temporal TMS.

Treatment effects were assessed by using a standardized tinnitus questionnaire directly after the therapy and three months later. Evaluation after three months revealed remarkable advantages for the group of patients who received the combination TMS treatment.

The results of the study support recent data that suggest that auditory and non-auditory areas of the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of tinnitus, and that this information can guide future treatment strategies.

Title: Combined Temporal and Prefrontal TMS for Tinnitus Treatment

Authors: Tobias Kleinjung MD, Peter Eichhammer, MD, Michael Landgrebe, MD, Philipp Sand, MD,Goeran Hajak, MD, Juergen Strutz, MD, PhD,Berthold Langguth, MD


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. "Combined TMS Shows Potential In Tinnitus Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070928221928.htm>.
American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. (2007, September 30). Combined TMS Shows Potential In Tinnitus Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070928221928.htm
American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. "Combined TMS Shows Potential In Tinnitus Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070928221928.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Court Ruling Means Kids' Online Activity Could Be On Parents

Court Ruling Means Kids' Online Activity Could Be On Parents

Newsy (Oct. 17, 2014) — In a ruling attorneys for both sides agreed was a first of its kind, a Georgia appeals court said parents can be held liable for what kids put online. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Foods To Boost Your Mood

The Best Foods To Boost Your Mood

Buzz60 (Oct. 17, 2014) — Feeling down? Reach for the refrigerator, not the medicine cabinet! TC Newman (@PurpleTCNewman) shares some of the best foods to boost your mood. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
You Can Get Addicted To Google Glass, Apparently

You Can Get Addicted To Google Glass, Apparently

Newsy (Oct. 15, 2014) — Researchers claim they’ve diagnosed the first example of the disorder in a 31-year-old U.S. Navy serviceman. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Confirmed Case Of Google Glass Addiction

First Confirmed Case Of Google Glass Addiction

Buzz60 (Oct. 15, 2014) — A Google Glass user was treated for Internet Addiction Disorder caused from overuse of the device. Morgan Manousos (@MorganManousos) has the details on how many hours he spent wearing the glasses, and what his symptoms were. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins