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The 'Arms' Race: Adult Steroid Users Seek Muscles, Not Medals

Date:
October 12, 2007
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
The majority of nonmedical anabolic-androgenic steroid users are not cheating athletes or risk-taking teenagers. According to a recent survey, containing the largest sample to date, the typical male user is about 30 years old, well-educated and earning an above-average income in a white-collar occupation. The majority did not use steroids during adolescence and were not motivated by athletic competition or sports performance.

The majority of non-medical anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) users are not cheating athletes or risk-taking teenagers. According to a recent survey, containing the largest sample to date the typical male user is about 30 years old, well-educated, and earning an above-average income in a white-collar occupation. The majority did not use steroids during adolescence and were not motivated by athletic competition or sports performance.

The study, conducted by a collaboration of researchers from around the country coordinated by Jason Cohen, Psy.D. candidate, used a web-based survey of nearly 2,000 US males. Whereas athletes are tempted to take anabolic steroids to improve sports performance, the study suggests that physical self-improvement motivates the unrecognized majority of non-medical AAS users who particularly want to increase muscle mass, strength, and physical attractiveness. Other significant but less highly ranked factors included increased confidence, decreased fat, improved mood and attraction of sexual partners.

Although often considered similar to abusers of narcotics and other illicit drugs (e.g., heroin or cocaine), non-medical AAS users are remarkably different. These users follow carefully planned drug regimens in conjunction with a healthy diet, ancillary drugs and exercise. As opposed to the spontaneous and haphazard approach seen in abusers of psychotropic drugs, everything is strategically planned to maximize benefits and minimize harm. "This is simply not a style or pattern of use we typically see when we examine substance abuse" said Jack Darkes, Ph.D., one of the authors. "The notions of spontaneous drug seeking and loss of control do not apply to the vast majority of AAS users," added co-author Daniel Gwartney, M.D.

"These findings question commonly held views of typical AAS users and their underlying motivations," said Rick Collins, one of the study's authors. "The focus on 'cheating' athletes and at risk youth has led to irrelevant policy as it relates to the predominant group of non-medical AAS users. The vast majority of AAS users are not athletes and hence, are not likely to view themselves as cheaters. The targeting of athletes through drug testing and other adolescent or sports-based interventions has no bearing on non-competitive adult users."

The study concludes that these AAS users are a driven and ambitious group dedicated to gym attendance, diet, occupational goals and educational attainment. "The users we surveyed consider that they are using directed drug technology as one part of a strategy for physical self-improvement within a health-centered lifestyle," said Collins. "Effective public policy should begin by accurately identifying who's using steroids and why. We hope our research - the largest adult survey of non-medical AAS use we know of - is a significant step forward in that direction."

Article: A League of Their Own: Demographics, Motivations and Patterns of Use of 1,955 Male Adult Non-Medical Anabolic Steroid Users in the United States, Jason Cohen, Rick Collins, Jack Darkes and Dan Gwartney, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (in press)


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The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "The 'Arms' Race: Adult Steroid Users Seek Muscles, Not Medals." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011065348.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2007, October 12). The 'Arms' Race: Adult Steroid Users Seek Muscles, Not Medals. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011065348.htm
BioMed Central. "The 'Arms' Race: Adult Steroid Users Seek Muscles, Not Medals." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011065348.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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