Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genetic Influence On Pace Of HIV-AIDS Progression Identified

Date:
October 24, 2007
Source:
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Summary:
Viral load -- the amount of virus in the blood of an HIV-infected person -- has long been viewed as the chief indicator of how quickly someone infected with HIV infection progresses to AIDS. New data builds on previous work that suggests that several other factors in addition to viral load significantly contribute to disease progression rates.

Viral load--the amount of virus in the blood of an HIV-infected person--has long been viewed as the chief indicator of how quickly someone infected with HIV infection progresses to AIDS.

New data published in Nature Immunology builds on previous work that suggests that several other factors in addition to viral load significantly contribute to disease progression rates.

Researchers led by Sunil Ahuja, M.D., of the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, examined genetic information from more than 3,500 HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals.

They found that individuals who had specific combinations of two genes--CCR5, which helps facilitate HIV entry into the cell, and CCL3L1, an immune response gene--were much more likely to have reduced immune responses and a greater decline in CD4 T cells, two hallmarks of progressive HIV disease.

Further, the researchers found that in HIV-infected subjects, viral load contributed only 9 percent to the variability in rate of progression to AIDS; variations in CCR5 and CCL3L1 combined accounted for 6 percent variability in AIDS progression rates.

The findings may have implications for the care of HIV-infected individuals in terms of being able to more effectively predict the course of HIV disease. With further research, this work may lead to additional markers, which along with viral load may serve as indicators of HIV progression. The study was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Article: "CCL3L1 and CCR5 influence cell-mediated immunity and affect HIV-AIDS pathogenesis via viral entry-independent mechanisms" by Matthew J. Dolan et al. Nature Immunology (Published online Sunday, October 21, 2007). DOI: 10.1038/ni1521 (2007).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Genetic Influence On Pace Of HIV-AIDS Progression Identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071022122210.htm>.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2007, October 24). Genetic Influence On Pace Of HIV-AIDS Progression Identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071022122210.htm
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Genetic Influence On Pace Of HIV-AIDS Progression Identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071022122210.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) As a third American missionary is confirmed to have contracted Ebola in Liberia, doctors on the ground in West Africa fear they're losing the battle against the outbreak. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) When Facebook acquired the virtual reality hardware developer Oculus VR in March for $2 billion, CEO Mark Zuckerberg hailed the firm's technology as "a new communication platform." Duration: 02:24 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins