Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mechanism For Acne Drug's Link To Depression Suggested By New Research

Date:
November 13, 2007
Source:
University of Bath
Summary:
New research has found that a drug used to treat severe forms of acne reduces the availability of the chemical serotonin, low levels of which have been linked to aggression and clinical depression.

New research has found that a drug used to treat severe forms of acne reduces the availability of the chemical serotonin, low levels of which have been linked to aggression and clinical depression.

In a study published in the journal Experimental Biology and Medicine, scientists reveal a potential mechanism that might link the drug Roaccutane (Accutane in the US) to reported cases of depression in some patients taking the medication.

The researchers had previously reported that the drug caused depressive behaviour in mice but, until now, the mechanism by which this might happen was unknown.

Using cells cultured in a laboratory, scientists from the University of Bath (UK) and University of Texas at Austin (USA) were able to monitor the effect of the drug on the chemistry of the cells that produce serotonin.

They found that the cells significantly increased production of proteins and cell metabolites that are known to reduce the availability of serotonin.

This, says scientists, could disrupt the process by which serotonin relays signals between neurons in the brain and may be the cause of depression-related behaviour.

“Serotonin is an important chemical that relays signals from nerve cells to other cells in the body,” said Dr Sarah Bailey from the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology at the University of Bath.

“In the brain it is thought to play an important role in the regulation of a range of behaviours, such as aggression, anger and sleep. Low levels of serotonin have been linked to depression, as well as bipolar and anxiety disorders.

“Many medications aimed at treating depression seek to increase levels of serotonin to help overcome these problems," continued Dr Bailey. “Our findings suggest that Roaccutane might disrupt the way serotonin is produced and made available to the cells.

“This could result in problems associated with low levels of serotonin, which might include depression. We are currently looking into this mechanism in more detail.”

The research is funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Institutes of Health and the University of Texas at Austin.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bath. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Bath. "Mechanism For Acne Drug's Link To Depression Suggested By New Research." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071112092800.htm>.
University of Bath. (2007, November 13). Mechanism For Acne Drug's Link To Depression Suggested By New Research. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071112092800.htm
University of Bath. "Mechanism For Acne Drug's Link To Depression Suggested By New Research." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071112092800.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) More and more studies are showing positive benefits to playing video games, but the jury is still out on brain training programs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Research from Washington University suggest people with conscientious spouses have greater career success. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Researchers say certain markers in the blood can predict risk of psychosis later in the life. The test can aid in early treatment for the condition. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

AP (Sep. 25, 2014) Teri Tacheny, a harpist, has a loyal following of fans who appreciate her soothing music. Every month, gorillas, orangutans and monkeys amble down to hear her play at the Como Park Zoo in Minnesota. (Sept. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins