Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Type Of Oral Cancer Linked To Ethnicity: Are Cultural Habits To Blame?

Date:
November 15, 2007
Source:
University of Southern California
Summary:
Clinicians have unraveled a connection between the incidence of oral cancer and race and ethnicity -- as part of first epidemiological study of oral cancer in California.

Clinicians from the USC School of Dentistry unravel connection between the incidence of oral cancer and race and ethnicity-- as part of first epidemiological study of oral cancer in California. Dr. Satish Kumar and Dr.Parish Sedghizadeh, clinical professors in the school's Division of Diagnostic Sciences, gleaned through 20 years of records from the California Cancer Registry (CCR)--the state's cancer surveillance database--for the incidence rates of invasive squamous cell carcinoma, the most common form of oral cancer.

Kumar and Sedghizadeh theorized that groups who engaged in these high-risk behaviors would also experience higher rates of oral cancer. The researchers discovered that different ethnic groups living in California manifest the disease very differently. African Americans and Caucasians, who have the highest oral cancer rates, are most likely to develop cancer of the tongue. Among Asian populations, Koreans had the highest incidence of tongue cancer, while Southeast Asians were more likely to develop the disease in the buccal mucosa, or inner cheek. Filipino women have the highest incidence of cancer of the palate.

The research team theorized that cultural habits are to blame. From what we know of how the cancer develops, we can extrapolate that cultural habits and lifestyle choices are directly linked to the prevalence of oral cancer in certain groups," Kumar says. They were right.

For example, African American and Caucasian men, with the highest rates of cancer of the tongue, also have the highest rates of cigarette smoking in the state. In Asian groups, Koreans have the highest cigarette smoking rates. The practice of chewing tobacco, or areca nut, most common in South Asian cultures, may account for that group's likelihood of developing the disease in the inner cheek.

The high rate of palatial cancer among Filipino women could be attributed to the practice of reverse smoking, when the lit part of the cigarette is concealed inside the mouth "Smoking is still considered taboo among Philippine women," Sedghizadeh says. "The lit part of the cigarette contains the most carcinogens and if held near the palate, could account for these statistics."

Up to two-thirds of oral cancers are caused by tobacco or alcohol use, according to the Oral Cancer Foundation. Though the cancer will claim the lives of 7,500 Americans this year, it is the most diagnosed cancer in many developing countries--including India, China and Vietnam--where its populations engage in these high-risk behaviors.

The study represents the first effort to analyze the epidemiology of oral cancer from statistics gathered by the CCR. "Basically we had a trove of information that had never before been accessed," says Sedghizadeh. "People have looked at breast and prostate and other types of cancers, but no one had mined this field for oral cancer statistics."

The research team hopes their findings can help tailor oral cancer prevention messages aimed at particular ethnic groups. "If we are aware that certain subsets are getting a particular kind of oral cancer, we can develop educational materials tailored to that particular risk activity and that particular group," Sedghizadeh says. "Ultimately we realize that need to increase awareness not just for the individual," Kumar says, "but for their entire community as well.

Their findings will be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology and are currently available on the journal's website.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southern California. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Southern California. "Type Of Oral Cancer Linked To Ethnicity: Are Cultural Habits To Blame?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071114121331.htm>.
University of Southern California. (2007, November 15). Type Of Oral Cancer Linked To Ethnicity: Are Cultural Habits To Blame?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071114121331.htm
University of Southern California. "Type Of Oral Cancer Linked To Ethnicity: Are Cultural Habits To Blame?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071114121331.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins