Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Breakthrough In Organ Rejection Diagnosis Examines Gene Behavior

Date:
November 20, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
A new technique improves the identification of possible organ rejection in kidney transplants. The technique, which uses a microarray or “Gene Chip,” a process of examining DNA sequences, defines how major causes of organ disease leading to rejection share similar disturbances in gene behavior.

A new article appearing in American Journal of Transplantation describes a revolutionary technique for more clearly identifying the possibility of organ rejection in kidney transplants.

The technique, which uses a microarray or “Gene Chip,” a process of examining DNA sequences, defines how major causes of organ disease leading to rejection share similar disturbances in gene behavior. The study is the first to show how gene sets, as opposed to single genes, can be used for diagnosis of rejection in individual patients, and offers new insight into the mechanisms of these gene changes.

“The key problem in transplantation is to diagnose rejection. This has traditionally been done with the microscope by reading the appearance of the tissue. We are showing how this can be performed by reading the changes in expression of genes, and in particular, expression of sets of genes,” says Philip F. Halloran, M.D., lead author of the study and Editor-in-Chief of American Journal of Transplantation. “This is a more objective and accurate method of identifying the possibility of organ rejection.”

The authors established sets of genes – transcripts sets – based on disease pathogenesis. They found a threshold for expression below which the studied biopsies did not show evidence of rejection. The findings displayed a series of major biologic indicators that occur before and during organ rejection. The results showed that previous histologic criteria, particularly relating to the cut-off between borderline organ acceptance and rejection, are unreliable.

The gene behaviors identified showed strong correlations, indicating that disturbances leading to transplant rejection have stereotyped structures. Samples from the study that lacked these disturbances did not lead to organ rejection.

The features of this structure are also found in lower levels in many forms of organ disease and injury. “The system of reading biopsies that was developed in the study can be used with to help understand a variety of disease processes,” says Halloran.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Breakthrough In Organ Rejection Diagnosis Examines Gene Behavior." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071119170142.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, November 20). Breakthrough In Organ Rejection Diagnosis Examines Gene Behavior. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071119170142.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Breakthrough In Organ Rejection Diagnosis Examines Gene Behavior." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071119170142.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins