Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Portable Devices, More Distribution Routes For Shows Revolutionizing TV

Date:
January 15, 2008
Source:
University of Michigan
Summary:
Digital video recorders and portable viewing devices are changing people's viewing behaviors, but these innovations will not lead to the demise of television. These gadgets, as well as better ways for viewers to see TV shows after their original airing, are revolutionizing the television industry.

Digital video recorders and portable viewing devices are changing people’s viewing behaviors, but these innovations will not lead to the demise of television, according to a University of Michigan researcher.

These gadgets, as well as better ways for viewers to see TV shows after their original airing, are revolutionizing the television industry, said Amanda Lotz, an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies.

"The changes in television during the last two decades are extraordinary and on the scale of transition from one medium to another, as in the case of the shift from radio to television," Lotz said. In her latest research, she describes this period as the post-network era, which finds television viewers having more control over when and where to view shows instead of limiting them to watching at certain times or channels.

"The post-network distinction is not meant to suggest the end or irrelevance of networks—just the erosion of their control of how and when viewers watch particular programs," Lotz said.

For decades, watching television involved walking into a room, turning on the set, and either selecting specific content or channel surfing. But the integration of new technologies is changing people’s viewing behaviors, Lotz says. Viewers now have greater mobility—reception of breaking news or a live sporting event on devices such as cell phones—and convenience.

Distribution also has been affected by television’s revolution. Viewers no longer have to wait for shows to air in syndication on cable channels or local stations. Some shows can be seen within hours of their original airing on the Internet and viewers can buy complete seasons on DVD. The profits from these new distribution routes have created animosity between producers and Hollywood writers, who have been on strike since Nov. 5 because they want a greater share of program revenues from the Internet.

"It is clear that the old business norms are no longer adequate, yet the future financing models also remain uncertain. This makes establishing long-term contracts dubious for both sides," said Lotz, whose expertise also includes gender and advertising as it relates to television.

But television’s revolution does come at a price. For instance, consumers with analog televisions will need to purchase a converter box because the FCC has ruled all TV programming will be transmitted by a digital signal in early 2009.

"Viewers have faced many changes at once and it is unclear to the average viewer how these new technologies, ways of receiving shows, and program forms—like the growth of reality TV and product placement—fit together," Lotz said. "What we see on television is tied directly to its business norms. The shifting business norms have created tremendous opportunities for new and varied storytelling."

Lotz’ findings appear in her new book, "The Television will be Revolutionized."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan. "Portable Devices, More Distribution Routes For Shows Revolutionizing TV." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080113162953.htm>.
University of Michigan. (2008, January 15). Portable Devices, More Distribution Routes For Shows Revolutionizing TV. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080113162953.htm
University of Michigan. "Portable Devices, More Distribution Routes For Shows Revolutionizing TV." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080113162953.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Halliburton Reaches $1B Gulf Spill Settlement

Halliburton Reaches $1B Gulf Spill Settlement

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) Halliburton's agreement to pay more than $1 billion to settle numerous claims involving the 2010 BP oil spill could be a way to diminish years of costly litigation. A federal judge still has to approve the settlement. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google Teases India Event, Possible Android One Reveal

Google Teases India Event, Possible Android One Reveal

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) Google has announced a Sept. 15 event in India during which they're expected to reveal their Android One phones. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins