Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Therapy Effectively Treats Deep Vein Thrombosis, Study Suggests

Date:
January 30, 2008
Source:
Radiological Society of North America
Summary:
A novel treatment for blood clots in the legs appears to be safe and effective, according to a pilot study. The study found that injecting or "lacing" the clot with a fiber-binding thrombolytic agent effectively treats deep vein thrombosis and reduces the risk of subsequent recurrence or bleeding.

A novel treatment for blood clots in the legs appears to be safe and effective, according to a pilot study. The study found that injecting or "lacing" the clot with a fiber-binding thrombolytic agent effectively treats deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and reduces the risk of subsequent recurrence or bleeding.

Related Articles


"This treatment regimen is able to clear blood clots rapidly and safely, restoring blood flow in the veins of the lower leg, and the results are durable," said lead author Richard Chang, M.D., chief of the interventional radiology section of the Department of Radiology, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Md.

DVT is a common and serious health problem in which a blood clot, or thrombus, form in the deep veins, particularly in the lower leg or thigh. Complications occur when the clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, resulting in pulmonary embolism, a potentially fatal condition.

Most patients with DVT are treated solely with anticoagulation therapy (blood thinners) and compression stockings. However, studies have shown that one-third of these patients will suffer from post-thrombotic syndrome, characterized by pain, swelling, or in severe cases by changes in skin color or skin ulceration. Another third are likely to have another clot or pulmonary embolism within five years of their initial DVT.

Treatments with thrombolytic (clot-dissolving) therapy could potentially protect against these occurrences, but can pose a bleeding risk. Therefore, Dr. Chang and colleagues sought to develop a safe, effective and affordable thrombolytic treatment regimen for DVT.

Twenty patients with acute DVT were treated with direct intraclot lacing of the thrombus with a clot-dissolving agent called alteplase and full systemic anticoagulation. Alteplase binds to the clot, so the procedure does not require continuous infusion of the drug, as do some thrombolytic therapies. With this treatment, after lacing one vein segment with alteplase, the interventional radiologist can immediately direct catheters to treat other vein segments to ensure that the entire clot has been adequately treated.

The results of the study showed that blood flow was restored throughout the deep venous system in 16 (80 percent) of the 20 patients during therapy with complete resolution of symptoms in 18 patients (90 percent) after six months of anticoagulation. Alteplase was cleared from the patients' circulatory system within two hours of treatment, reducing the risk of subsequent bleeding.

There were no serious complications or bleeding during the treatment, and no cases of post-thrombotic syndrome or recurrent clotting during follow-up of 3.4 years.

"With this therapy, pain and swelling resolve rapidly, and, in most cases, the patient is able to resume all normal activity within a week," said the study's co-author, McDonald K. Horne III, M.D., from the hematology section of the Department of Lab Medicine, Clinical Center, NIH.

The authors caution that larger clinical trials are required to further support the efficacy of this promising treatment.

Journal reference: "Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity: Direct Intraclot Injection of Alteplase Once Daily with Systemic Anticoagulation--Results of a Pilot Study." Collaborating with Drs. Chang and Horne were Clara C. Chen, M.D., Anthony Kam, M.D., Ph.D., Edie Mao, M.B., and Thomas H. Shawker, M.D. Radiology. February 2008.

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Radiological Society of North America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Radiological Society of North America. "New Therapy Effectively Treats Deep Vein Thrombosis, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080129080704.htm>.
Radiological Society of North America. (2008, January 30). New Therapy Effectively Treats Deep Vein Thrombosis, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080129080704.htm
Radiological Society of North America. "New Therapy Effectively Treats Deep Vein Thrombosis, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080129080704.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) A whole virus Ebola vaccine has been shown to protect monkeys exposed to the virus. Here&apos;s what&apos;s different about this vaccine. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 26, 2015) Governor Mike Pence declares the recent HIV outbreak in rural Indiana a "public health emergency" and authorizes a short-term needle-exchange program. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins