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Subconscious Signals Can Trigger Drug Craving

Date:
February 6, 2008
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Using a brain imaging technology called functional magnetic resonance imaging, scientists have discovered that cocaine-related images trigger the emotional centers of the brains of patients addicted to drugs -- even when the subjects are unaware they've seen anything.

Cocaine patients were shown photos such as these. The 24 randomly-presented 33 msec targets in each of four categories (cocaine, sexual, aversive and neutral, interspersed with grey-screen nulls) were immediately followed by a 467 msec neutral “masking” stimulus”. Under these conditions, the 33 msec stimuli can escape conscious detection.
Credit: Childress AR, Ehrman RN, Wang Z, Li Y, Sciortino N, et al.

Using a brain imaging technology called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), scientists have discovered that cocaine-related images trigger the emotional centers of the brains of patients addicted to drugs -- even when the subjects are unaware they've seen anything.

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A team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, led by Dr. Anna Rose Childress and Dr. Charles O'Brien, showed cocaine patients photos of drug-related cues like crack pipes and chunks of cocaine. The images flashed by in just 33 milliseconds -- so quickly that the patients were not consciously aware of seeing them. Nonetheless, the unseen images stimulated activity in the limbic system, a brain network involved in emotion and reward, which has been implicated in drug-seeking and craving.

"This is the first evidence that cues outside one's awareness can trigger rapid activation of the circuits driving drug-seeking behavior," said NIDA director Dr. Nora Volkow. "Patients often can't pinpoint when or why they start craving drugs. Understanding how the brain initiates that overwhelming desire for drugs is essential to treating addiction."

To verify that the patterns of brain activity triggered by the subconscious cues reflected the patients' feelings about drugs, Childress and her colleagues gave the patients a different test two days later, allowing them to look longer at the drug images. The patients who demonstrated the strongest brain response to unseen cues in the fMRI experiment also felt the strongest positive association with visible drug cues. Childress notes, "It's striking that the way people feel about these drug-related images is accurately predicted by how strongly their brains respond within just 33 milliseconds."

Childress and her colleagues also found that the regions of the brain activated by drug images overlapped substantially with those activated by sexual images. This finding supports the scientific consensus that addictive drugs usurp brain regions that recognize natural rewards needed for survival, like food and sex.

According to Childress, these results could improve drug treatment strategies. "We have a brain hard-wired to appreciate rewards, and cocaine and other drugs of abuse latch onto this system. We are looking at the potential for new medications that reduce the brain's sensitivity to these conditioned drug cues and would give patients a fighting chance to manage their urges."

Citation: Childress AR, Ehrman RN, Wang Z, Li Y, Sciortino N, et al (2008) Prelude to Passion: Limbic Activation by ''Unseen'' Drug and Sexual Cues. PLoS One 3(1): e1506. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001506 http://www.plosone.org/doi/pone.0001506

The study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).


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The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Subconscious Signals Can Trigger Drug Craving." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080130092113.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2008, February 6). Subconscious Signals Can Trigger Drug Craving. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080130092113.htm
Public Library of Science. "Subconscious Signals Can Trigger Drug Craving." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080130092113.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

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