Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

References To Explicit Substance Use Common In Popular Music

Date:
February 6, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Approximately one-third of popular songs include reference to explicit drug, alcohol or tobacco use, although this portrayal varies widely by musical genre, according to a new report.

Approximately one-third of popular songs include reference to explicit drug, alcohol or tobacco use, although this portrayal varies widely by musical genre, according to a new report.

Related Articles


The influence of music on humans has been recognized for centuries, according to background information in the article. "While 15- to 18-year-old adolescents are forming health attitudes and behaviors that will last a lifetime, they are exposed to 2.4 hours of music per day, according to a large nationally representative study," the authors write. Most (98 percent) children and adolescents have a radio and CD or MP3 player in their home and many of them have these in their bedrooms.

Brian A. Primack, Ed.M., M.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues analyzed Billboard magazine's 279 most popular songs of 2005. They noted every mention of substance use in pop, rock, R&B/hip-hop, country and rap songs and determined the motivations for, associations with and consequences of use within each genre.

"Overall, 116 of the 279 unique songs (41.6 percent) had a substance use reference of any kind. Ninety-three songs (33.3 percent) contained explicit substance use references," the authors note. One or more references to substance use were found in three of 35 pop songs (9 percent), nine of 66 rock songs (14 percent), 11 of 55 R&B/hip-hop songs (20 percent), 22 of 61 country songs (36 percent) and 48 of 62 rap songs (77 percent). "While only 2.9 percent of the 279 songs portrayed tobacco use, 23.7 depicted alcohol use, 13.6 percent depicted marijuana use and 11.5 percent depicted other or unspecified substance use."

In the 93 songs referencing substance use, the behavior was most often motivated by peer/social pressure (48 percent) or sex (30 percent). Use of the substance(s) was frequently associated with partying (54 percent), sex (46 percent), violence (29 percent) and/or humor (24 percent). "Only four songs (4 percent) contained explicit anti-use messages, and none portrayed substance refusal," the authors write. "Most songs with substance use (63 [68 percent]) portrayed more positive than negative consequences; these positive consequences were most commonly social, sexual, financial or emotional."

"In summary, children and adolescents are heavily exposed to substance use in popular music, and this exposure varies widely by genre. Substance use in music is frequently motivated by peer acceptance and sex, and it has highly positive associations and consequences," the authors conclude. "Research is needed to (1) determine the potency of exposure to substance use messages in music in adolescents and (2) determine the effects of various types of substance abuse messages, such as those with certain associations and consequences."

Journal reference: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162[2]:169-175.

This study was supported in part by a career development award from the National Cancer Institute; by a Physician Faculty Scholar Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; by a grant from the Maurice Falk Foundation; and in part by a career development award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "References To Explicit Substance Use Common In Popular Music." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080204161425.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, February 6). References To Explicit Substance Use Common In Popular Music. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080204161425.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "References To Explicit Substance Use Common In Popular Music." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080204161425.htm (accessed November 25, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins