Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Release Regulated By Brain's Biological Clock

Date:
February 7, 2008
Source:
Mount Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have discovered that the release of blood stem cells from bone marrow is regulated by the brain through the cyclical human biological clock, via adrenergic signals transmitted by the sympathetic nervous system. These new findings point out that the harvest of stem cells for transplantation may be improved by timing it at the peak of their release.

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered that the release of blood stem cells from bone marrow is regulated by the brain through the cyclical human biological clock, via adrenergic signals transmitted by the sympathetic nervous system. These new findings point out that the harvest of stem cells for transplantation may be improved by timing it at the peak of their release.

The study describes the mechanisms at the molecular levels in which signals from the biological clock in the brain are sent via the sympathetic—or "fight or flight" branch—of the nervous system, directly to bone marrow stem cell niches. Researchers, using mice as a model, were able to show the rhythmic release and peak of stem cells in circulation during the mouse’s resting period, and that changes in the light cycle or an experimental “jet lag” altered the release patterns. This is the first time a study has demonstrated that the brain regulates a stem cell niche.

“We don’t know why stem cells circulate in the blood but the maximal release of stem cells in the circulation occurs when the animal is resting. This argues for a role in regeneration,” says Paul S. Frenette, M.D., Professor in the Department of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. “More practically, the rhythmic oscillations of circulating stem cells suggest that harvest could be optimized by simply timing the collection of stem cells at the peak of release.”

The vast majority of bone marrow transplantation procedures are currently done using stem cells harvested in the peripheral blood. The current harvesting procedure, however, may not be adequate in some patients, particularly in those that have received prior treatments for cancer.

“What is really amazing to us is that the brain—through the autonomous branch of the nervous system—directly controls stem cells in their microenvironment,” said Dr. Frenette. “An important implication in today’s busy world is that changes in normal biological rhythms, for example by working night shifts or a jet lag, could affect the number of stem cells harvested from donors.”

This research was published online February 6 on the website of the journal Nature.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mount Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mount Sinai Medical Center. "Bone Marrow Stem Cell Release Regulated By Brain's Biological Clock." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080206212051.htm>.
Mount Sinai Medical Center. (2008, February 7). Bone Marrow Stem Cell Release Regulated By Brain's Biological Clock. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080206212051.htm
Mount Sinai Medical Center. "Bone Marrow Stem Cell Release Regulated By Brain's Biological Clock." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080206212051.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 22, 2014) Big pharma on the move as Novartis boss, Joe Jimenez, tells Reuters about plans to transform his company via an asset exchange with GSK, and Astra Zeneca shares surge on speculation that Pfizer is looking for a takeover. Joanna Partridge reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is given hands-on demonstrations Tuesday of some of the newest research from DARPA _ the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins