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At Last A Machine With Good Taste -- For Espresso

Date:
February 12, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Can a machine taste coffee? The question has plagued scientists studying the caffeinated beverage for decades. Fortunately, researchers in Switzerland can now answer with a resounding "yes." For the food industry, "electronic tasters" like the new coffee-tasting machine could prove useful as quality control devices to monitor food production and processing.

Can a machine taste coffee? The question has plagued scientists studying the caffeinated beverage for decades. Fortunately, researchers in Switzerland can now answer with a resounding "yes."

For the food industry, "electronic tasters" like the new coffee-tasting machine could prove useful as quality control devices to monitor food production and processing. Christian Lindinger and colleagues at Nestlι Research pointed out that coffee scientists have long been searching for instrumental approaches to complement and eventually replace human sensory profiling.

However, the multisensory experience from drinking a cup of coffee makes it a particular challenge for flavor scientists trying to replicate these sensations on a machine. More than 1,000 substances may contribute to the complex aroma of coffee.

The new tasting machine assessed the taste and aromatic qualities of espresso coffee nearly as accurately as a panel of trained human espresso tasters, the study reported. It analyzed gases released by a heated espresso sample, then transformed the most pertinent chemical information into taste qualities like roasted, flowery, woody, toffee and acidity. "This work represents significant progress in terms of correlation of sensory with instrumental results exemplified on coffee," state the authors.

The article "When Machine Tastes Coffee: Instrumental Approach to Predict the Sensory Profile of Espresso Coffee" is scheduled for the March 1 issue of ACS' Analytical Chemistry.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "At Last A Machine With Good Taste -- For Espresso." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080211093949.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, February 12). At Last A Machine With Good Taste -- For Espresso. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080211093949.htm
American Chemical Society. "At Last A Machine With Good Taste -- For Espresso." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080211093949.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

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