Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Secure Internet Transactions At Internet Cafes Possible With Tiny Security Device

Date:
February 22, 2008
Source:
CSIRO Australia
Summary:
A prototype portable device that will allow people to do business across the Internet on any computer in a trusted manner has been developed Known as a Trust Extension Device, the TED consists of software loaded onto a portable device, such as a USB memory stick or a mobile phone. It is able to minimize the risk associated with performing transactions in untrusted and unknown computing environments.

ICT Centre researchers Dr John Zic and Dr Surya Nepal have invented a way of making trust in computing environments portable.
Credit: Image courtesy of CSIRO Australia

CSIRO has developed a prototype portable device that will allow people to do business across the internet on any computer in a trusted manner.

Known as a Trust Extension Device (TED), the TED consists of software loaded onto a portable device, such as a USB memory stick or a mobile phone. It is able to minimise the risk associated with performing transactions in untrusted and unknown computing environments.

“The problem is that trust is currently tied to specific, well-known computing environments,” says CSIRO ICT Centre’s, Dr John Zic.

“TED makes that trust portable, opening the way for secure transactions to be undertaken anywhere, even in an internet café.”

The concept behind TED is that an enterprise issues a trusted customer with a portable device containing a small operating system, as well as a set of applications and encrypted data.

This device creates its own environment on an untrusted computer and, before it runs an application, it establishes trust with the remote enterprise server. Both ends must prove their identities to each other and that the computing environments are as expected.

Once the parties prove to each other they are trustworthy, the TED accesses the remote server and the transaction takes place.

“The idea is that the person or organisation issuing the device runs their own computing environment and applications within the TED,” says Dr Zic.

Focus groups run by the Centre for Networking Technologies for the Information Economy, funded by Australian Government, suggested developing a device to facilitate trusted transactions and provide authorised people with access to confidential and private information.

For instance, banks could use a technology like TED to provide authorised customers and employees with access to financial data, or conduct financial transactions over the internet.

“The idea is that the person or organisation issuing the device runs their own computing environment and applications within the TED,” says Dr Zic.

“Wherever you go, whichever machine you run on, you and the issuer can be confident both parties are known to each other, cannot engage in any malicious acts, and that the transactions are trusted.”

The CSIRO ICT Centre is currently calling for expressions of interest from parties interested in licensing the technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by CSIRO Australia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

CSIRO Australia. "Secure Internet Transactions At Internet Cafes Possible With Tiny Security Device." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080219093009.htm>.
CSIRO Australia. (2008, February 22). Secure Internet Transactions At Internet Cafes Possible With Tiny Security Device. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080219093009.htm
CSIRO Australia. "Secure Internet Transactions At Internet Cafes Possible With Tiny Security Device." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080219093009.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ballmer Leaves Microsoft's Board, Has Advice For Nadella

Ballmer Leaves Microsoft's Board, Has Advice For Nadella

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) — In a letter to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, Ballmer said he's leaving the board of directors and offered tips on how the company can be successful. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Google Can Gain From Special Accounts For Children

What Google Can Gain From Special Accounts For Children

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) — Google will reportedly offer official accounts for children younger than 13 years old. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakingviews: Ebola's Economic Impact Could Eclipse SARS

Breakingviews: Ebola's Economic Impact Could Eclipse SARS

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 18, 2014) — The virus ravaging Africa has yet to spread elsewhere. Yet Asia’s SARS crisis in 2003 showed how changes to behaviour can hurt the economy more than the actual disease, says Breakingviews' Una Galani. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Twitter Users Up In Arms After 'Favorites' Show Up In Feeds

Twitter Users Up In Arms After 'Favorites' Show Up In Feeds

Newsy (Aug. 17, 2014) — Twitter is testing a feature on some users that shows favorited tweets from people they follow in their own timeline, the same way a retweet appears. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins