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New Protein Family Implicated In Inflammatory Diseases

Date:
March 12, 2008
Source:
University of Central Florida
Summary:
A newly discovered new protein family may play an important role in preventing inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, some forms of cancer and even heart disease.

UCF researchers Jian Lian and Mingui Fu work in their lab at the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences at UCF.
Credit: Photo by Jacque Brund

A University of Central Florida research team has discovered a new protein family that may play an important role in preventing inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, some forms of cancer and even heart disease.

The findings may in the future aid the body's defense system. In 2006, heart disease and strokes accounted for more than 12.7 million deaths around the world, according to the World Health Organization.

"What we found is a family of proteins that control macrophage activation," researcher Mingui Fu said from a laboratory in the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences at UCF.

Macrophages are the body's self-cleaners. They live in the bloodstream and are called to action when bacteria or other foreign objects attack. Scientists have been studying what triggers them, but no one has come up with a step-by-step process yet. Once triggered, macrophages travel to the infection site and gobble up the invader, helping the body heal. The attack is manifested by inflammation at the infection site.

When everything works right, the inflammation goes away and the person's health improves. But when macrophages go awry, they can cause more harm than good. Sometimes the macrophages mistake the body's own organs for invaders and attack, and that can cause arthritis or some forms of cancer. Sometimes the cleaners fail to detect threats, such as malignant cancer cells, which then go unregulated and can turn into fatal tumors.

When Fu arrived at UCF in 2007, he teamed up with Pappachan Kolattukudy, the director of the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences. Kolattukudy's laboratory has been studying for two decades how a small protein called MCP, produced at the site of injury, infection or inflammation, attracts macrophages to the site to clean up. Last year his team published the discovery of a novel gene called MCPIP that is turned on by MCP. They showed that MCPIP is involved in the development of ischemic heart failure, the leading cause of death. This team has been exploring how this new gene works.

MCPIP turns out to be the first member of a small, newly discovered gene family called CCCH-Zinc fingure proteins. This family appears to switch the macrophages on and off. The researchers continue to study different aspects of the proteins because of the possibility that they will be critical in treating and curing inflammatory diseases.

Kolattukudy said the new protein holds a lot of promise, but more studies are needed.

"Because this novel protein has key roles to play in the major inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and obesity-induced type2 diabetes, it is a promising drug target," Kolattukudy said. "We have a patent application filed on this protein for that purpose."

This research was published in the March 7 edition of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Co-researchers on the project include Jian Liang, Jin Wang, Asim Azfer, Wenjun Song, Gail Tromp and Kolattukudy, all from UCF's Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences in the College of Medicine. The research is partially funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Central Florida. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Central Florida. "New Protein Family Implicated In Inflammatory Diseases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080310110850.htm>.
University of Central Florida. (2008, March 12). New Protein Family Implicated In Inflammatory Diseases. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080310110850.htm
University of Central Florida. "New Protein Family Implicated In Inflammatory Diseases." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080310110850.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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